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Staying on a plane after pumping
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coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 2025

PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After getting on a plane in marginal conditions with longer lines bring your hands together with palms against the boom & push the boom away from you. Don't forget to point the toes.

Coachg
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bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 666
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 6:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Staying on a plane after pumping Reply with quote

rgomez wrote:

Anyways...My question is it possible to stay on a plane after pumping the sail?...and for how long? even if the real wind speed is a bit less than required for planing


If the true windspeed is less than required for planing, then there is no reason to pump, you will just waste a lot of energy and come off plane as soon as you stop pumping. However, as previously mentioned, it takes less (wind) energy to maintain planing than it does to get on plane. So pumping while on plane can be very effective for maintaining planing. The trick is to be able to read the wind on the water. If you are sailing along on plane and you see a lull up ahead, what you want to do is look upwind and beyond the lull to see if there is an area where the wind is filled back in or likely to fill in (like a puff coming down the lake). If there is, then you unhook from the harness, bear off slightly, and pump through the lull to connect up with the next puff. We used to do this all the time when sailing formula gear on our lake, seeing who could get on plane soonest and maintain planing the longest by connecting the puffs and pumping through the lulls.

Again, it's all about knowing your gear and finding the minimum windspeed you need for planing. There's no point in just going out and trying to pump around in 3 mph of wind, but having the ability to perform short bursts of well timed and well executed pumps is invaluable when sailing in marginal conditions.

sm
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 2501

PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

pumping to plane requires some commitment to a rigorous bit of body english that is a bit counter intuitive. one presses down on the boom to un-weight one's feet. then one has to recoil for another go. the weighting and pumping will look like the nose of the board and mast are swinging toward each other and away. this is best done with the board pointing on a broad reach. lotsa videos to choose from.

the trick is to do as few pumps as possible to get the board moving faster so one can move aft and get in the front strap. once there, the option to hook or not will be open. this will depend on how much speed has been attained. mast foot pressure is the key to so much in windsurfing. one must maintain lots of it until in both straps and hooked in.

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rgomez



Joined: 13 Dec 2012
Posts: 61

PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 2:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is great....My confusion was largely because I didnt realize that I that it takes more wind to get planing than needed to stay planing.

Also what born2shred say makes a lot of sense...reading the wind upwind and planing from one gusts to another and also trying to keep my weight off the board with increasing MFP.

I've been out shlogging out lot of times when I felt that I should have been planing...Im gonna try getting my weight off, pointing downwind and pumping it till i get on the plane and try to maintain it.

Thanks everyone...Smile
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edoremus337



Joined: 27 Aug 2011
Posts: 130

PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure if anyone has said this yet, but one of my tricks to stay on a plane when the wind lulls is to try and find any small wave or chop and use that to 'ride down' and get that extra small bit of speed. It can be the difference from staying on a plane or not.
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PeconicPuffin



Joined: 07 Jun 2004
Posts: 1231

PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rgomez wrote:
This is great....My confusion was largely because I didnt realize that I that it takes more wind to get planing than needed to stay planing.)


Great! Don't overdo it...it's easy to wipe yourself out pumping. Per jingebritsen, it should only take a few pumps to get you going if the wind speed is sufficient (enough to plane but not to get you planing). Once you learn the feeling of getting the board going, it will become easier. Also, per edoremus337, try using any swell at all (even if it's just a few inches high) to keep planing when you're on the verge of falling off. Downhill works.

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Last edited by PeconicPuffin on Wed Jul 17, 2013 9:41 am; edited 1 time in total
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d0uglass



Joined: 28 May 2004
Posts: 1089
Location: Bonita Springs, Florida

PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rgomez- PeconicPuffin said it well.

Indeed, there is a range of wind speed where there is enough wind to STAY planing, but not enough wind to GET planing... unless you pump. So effectively pumping to plane and gracefully staying on a plane are good skills to work on.

There can be quite a dramatic difference between how much wind an unskilled / non-pumping person needs to get and stay planing, and how much wind a skilled / pumping person needs to get and stay planing. The difference is especially pronounced with short and wide boards.

For example, with a 6.5 and 100 liter board I might be able to pump to plane and stay planing in 15 mph. But if I just held still and hooked into the sail it would probably take about 20 mph of wind to get me planing.

-James

PS- Note about the video link you posted. That sailor isn't exactly pumping to plane. He's pumping to catch a wave. He only planes when he's sliding down the slope of the wave, which is typically for the type of board he's riding ( a sailable SUP).

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