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Learning to windsurf on shortboard
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19306

PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And yet another beginner asks our advice, then refuses it. Sorry to go snide on ya, Nat, but we've heard it so MANY times. The collective on-the-water sailing time of the people in this forum runs into millions of planing miles and centuries of time; we suggest you listen.

But not to Zirtaeb's learning experience. His learning curve was at least 98% shorter than anyone's I ever met.

Sure, you can learn to sail on a shortboard, but the gimpy unathletic klutz down the street will leave you in his dust if he starts with lessons (videos cannot see your mistakes) and a beginner board or at least a longboard.

You face downwind, uphaul, place your front) hand (the one towards the nose of the board) on the aft side of the boom right behind the mast, pull that hand upwind until the mast is upwind of your front shoulder and you are looking at the nose through the sail window, extend your aft/back hand WITHOUT LEANING FORWARD to grasp the boom midway, and slowly sweep that back hand aft to apply some throttle and begin moving forward. At this stage you should always remain balanced; just "going for it" without reversible stability and full control will bypass the learning phase and slow you down in the long run.
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natbprice



Joined: 17 Jun 2016
Posts: 10

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about the Mistral New Malibu? Is that a good board for me to learn on? Is $150 a reasonable price if its in good condition?
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kmf



Joined: 02 Apr 2001
Posts: 493

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a thread on that board....

http://www.iwindsurf.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=22804

It would be better however than the boards that you own.

KMF
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kmf



Joined: 02 Apr 2001
Posts: 493

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would suggest finding a used modern beginner board, 180 litres minimum and at least 80 cm wide with a dagger board. You can learn so much on a board like that, that the cost is worth every penny. And after you are done with it you can sell it in a heartbeat. For what you paid for it..... The sails that you have will work on it....

A lesson is always a good deal.....

Have fun.

KMF
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 9492

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you elect to buy the Mistral Malibu, make sure that you have a universal with the proper pin that inserts into the mast track carriage, and make sure that it locks into position.

Regarding using the Bic that you have now, start with the smallest sail that you have. The purpose is to understand how everything works. A small sail is much easier to uphaul, and it's less likely to get you off balance. Of course, you're not going to get going quickly, but you will find that if you rake the sail back, you will move upwind. By tilting the mast forward, you will move downwind.

When it comes to beach starting at this stage, I would tend avoid it early in your development, because once you get outside and try to tack, you'll probably fall in and need to uphaul. If you can't uphaul, you're stuck in the wrong place, and more likely to be moved downwind from the launch.

When uphauling, it's best to position the universal right in the middle of the mast track, as it will ensure the best balance between the nose and tail. While uphauling the sail, you want to straddle the mast. Once you have the sail out of the water where the front of the boom is within reach, make sure that you are balanced and comfortable with the sail flagging directly downwind. In the transition to grabbing the boom, you want to step back so that you are positioned behind the mast. You can still be close to the mast, but you'll be in a better position to use the deck area behind it. Remember, as you grab the boom arm with both hands and present it to the wind, the wind and sail will want to unbalance you, so you have to learn to compensate. To make the process simpler, I would recommend removing the front footstraps so they won't trip you up.
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dllee



Joined: 03 Jul 2009
Posts: 4604
Location: East Bay

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, the New or Old Malibu is less stable than a Astro Dock, for uphauling and learning.
Astro has a totally FLAT deck, while both Malibu's were rounded in front of the front straps, right where a foot stands when you're uphauling.
And Malibu's were thicker, taking you higher off the water, so less balance and stability than a flat deck board with 40 liter's excessive floatation for 155lbs.
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NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 1228

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You MUST re-read isobars second post. All that he said that you need to do to make that board move forward is true... That and even more. So many people try to do what your doing ( learn on a short by yourself) just give up after few tries. Its not magic. It is a progression of acquired skills. Could you learn on that board? Yes but not likely by yourself in a lite wind location. We all here were at one time in the same boat or board that you are. We spent the time and acquired the skills. Now we enjoy the ride that is windsurfing. I have been doing this sport since 1980. After all this time, I still can't wait to get my next session in. Don't try to reinvent the wheel. Take heed to what we say. The gear you have will be great for your next step. But not your first step. I had the Astro rock and I loved it. You may only need 10 plus sessions on a larger board to make that next step. It may be longer. It all depends on you and the wind you get to sail in. But you need a bigger board. Think about a wind SUP. Great for lite wind days and you can paddle on the no wind days. Or get a older board with a dagger board. Beat it up until you get thing working then move on. Go to World winds In April and take lessons. It will be worth every penny you spend, you will have a great time time and meet the cool people that windsurf. Why why do it the hard way and be doomed to fail. Last thought. Get a Kona one. A board you will keep for life. Good to learn on. Super good for your lite wind location and you can even go to races once you get it all worked.
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ctuna



Joined: 27 Jun 1995
Posts: 889
Location: Santa Cruz Ca

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 12:52 am    Post subject: Windsurfing is Hard its not intuitive Reply with quote

Windsurfing is Hard its not intuitive
There are so many variables and its technical.
In surfing you can see the wave your moves and conditions are much
more limited. You can't see the wind only feel it or see it's
effects on the waters surface.
It's better to learn on big board as it lessens the steepness
of the learning curve.
For those of us that can't muscle it and don't like to get hurt
a more gradual approach is ultimately less frustrating and faster
though it may not seem like it at the time.
And lessons from a good instructor can't greatly reduce the learning
curve. You need lessons for this sport more than say skiing or surfing.
If you can't get lessons there are a lot of good instructional video's.
, sideoffvideo.com (tricktionary, Guy Cribb, Peter Hart have some of the
better ones.
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DelCarpenter



Joined: 06 Nov 2008
Posts: 433
Location: Cedar Falls, IA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Potential ways to learn to windsurf using a Bic Astro Rock:
1. Try the following on totally flat water in no or low wind conditions.
2. Try to use it as a stand up paddle board. (If that doesn't work after a few sessions you know the windsurfing learning curve on a Rock is way too steep.)
3. Attach pool noodles, at the edge of the rails, at or just below the waterline, the full length of the board's flatter section, with duct tape that goes from the bottom of the board around the noodle to the deck.
4. Build a simulator which will allow you to learn sail handling on dry land. Search the internet for "windsurfing simulator plans".

There are no special tips for learning windsurfing on short boards. Learning on short boards with no dagger is exactly the same as learning on a long board except for the really huge factor that the process on a short board is much, much harder.

You have to balance on the board. Your balancing must be fluid enough to counteract changes in the water underneath the board. Your balance changes must be fast enough to counter both the instant increases and instant decreases in the wind along with any water changes. Your balancing must be almost exactly right almost all of the time or you will fall in the water. And if you get that right enough to stay upright you still have to balance everything with the forces acting on the sail.

At Worthington MN on June 11th & 12th Roger Jackson could have taught you enough on a simulator and a Starboard Start to have you windsurfing (on that Start) in an hour. One of the great advantages of lessons is having someone who can see the difference between what you should be doing and what you actually are doing. Unfortunately, sailing a Start in a hour wouldn't get you anywhere close to being able to sail a 125 or 130 liter Rock.

After 5 days of lessons in 1984 and 5 days of lessons in 1985, I bought my own 12' 4" long, 26" wide Bic 250 (volume about 230) in 1986. I still had a lot to learn about the basics. I used "Ten Steps Guide to Windsurfing" (http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~wprinz/windsurfing/windindex.html
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NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 1228

PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2016 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You forget the advantages a dagger board gives. Mostly up wind glide and stability..
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