myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
removing a broken batten
Goto page Previous  1, 2
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
outhaul



Joined: 27 Sep 2011
Posts: 254

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2016 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Too late for me but I found this excellent video from Sailworks.
http://www.sailworks.com/batten-removal-installation
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 677
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2016 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Being a sail repair guy, I remove half battens often. The answer is simple. Unroll the sail onto a hard surface, like smooth concrete. For this explanation I assume if you are standing at the foot of the unrolled sail, looking toward the top, the luff sleeve will be at the right and the leach to the left. Go up to the broken batten and kneel on the concrete next to the sail at the luff sleeve. Place your left hand on the batten pocket about 12" from the luff sleeve and press firmly with you hand holding the fabric down, but not the batten. With you right hand push the batten end towards your left hand about 4 inches. Now press down firmly with your left hand on the batten and with your right hand pull the mast sleeve to the right. This should pop the batten free from the endpocket. Repeat until you can reach the broken end with needle nose pliers.

Oops. I posted this seconds after your post above. The video shows how to do what I just posted.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 914
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2016 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It all depends on how badly splintered the broken end of the batten is and whether you can get it to move. Also, the sail material at the leech end of the batten pocket is doubled over, so the seams and added material thickness can cause the batten to hang up there. Certainly if you can work the batten down and pull it free with pliers, that is the ideal situation, but it's not always feasible.

I recall many years back doing some repairs on older Windwings where the cam design would eventually cause the forward 2" or so of the batten to snap off inside the webbing inside the luff sleeve. No way to get that piece out without opening up the seam and pulling it out through the side.

Anyway, there are several tricks you can try, but if you end up having to open a seam, it's really not that big of a deal.

sm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DanWeiss



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 2237
Location: Connecticut, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A more aggressive solution involves slicing the batten pocket perpendicular to the seams and to remove the broken piece. Insert a new batten in the traditional method. It ain't pretty, but shouldn't cause any performance or durability issues whatsoever. Melting the cut edges will prevent the threads from widening the hole, if you care.
_________________
Support Your Sport. Join US Windsurfing!
www.USWindsurfing.org
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 914
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DanWeiss wrote:
A more aggressive solution involves slicing the batten pocket perpendicular to the seams and to remove the broken piece.


You have replaced a batten using this method?

sm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 2590

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bred2shred wrote:
DanWeiss wrote:
A more aggressive solution involves slicing the batten pocket perpendicular to the seams and to remove the broken piece.


You have replaced a batten using this method?

sm


Guilty. I did it four years ago. The batten had splintered so bad it wouldn't budge. I just used sail tape over the small vertical cut. I still have and use the sail on a regular basis.

You will notice on my earlier post that I stated as a last resort.

Coachg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DanWeiss



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 2237
Location: Connecticut, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bred2shred wrote:
DanWeiss wrote:
A more aggressive solution involves slicing the batten pocket perpendicular to the seams and to remove the broken piece.


You have replaced a batten using this method?

sm


Yes. Several. I shattered several battens going over the falls on a race sail. The carbon tubes broke and shards protruded through the pocket as well as completely through the other side of the sail. Brutal.

I used Patifix polyester on the film and sticky back Dacron on the pocket itself. No stitching necessary.

_________________
Support Your Sport. Join US Windsurfing!
www.USWindsurfing.org
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dhmark



Joined: 04 Sep 2007
Posts: 256

PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sails need to be designed better to deal with broken battens. My Hot sail broke one, and could not remove the luff side piece because the splinters hang up on threads or sailcloth when trying to push it out. I ended up opening a small part of the side of a batten pocket on the luff side; due to the Dacron construction, can scrunch up the sail and pull the batten out through a very small opening.
My old WindWings had a small opening on the luff side of the batten pocket, in order to convert the sail from RAF to cam, you'd back the batten out of the dead-end pocket, and reinsert in a different opening into the mast sleeve and put on the cam. Such a feature would make removing splintered battens quick and easy, no sail trauma. Just need a tiny gap in the batten pocket a few inches from the luff end.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 914
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or look at changing the batten design. The first thing that comes to mind to me, thinking back to Hobie Cat sails, they used to sell a product that could be sleeved over the batten itself and heated up to conform to the batten (basically just a heat shrink tube).

If this material (or something similar) was placed over the batten, then even if it broke, all of the batten splinters would be fully encased making the batten easy to remove from the pocket. It would also likely help prevent the broken ends of the batten from poking through the sail.

sm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bamer



Joined: 16 Nov 2016
Posts: 95

PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dhmark wrote:
Sails need to be designed better to deal with broken battens.


I don't think the solutions available are even remotely worth the added weight and cost. Most newer sails already have film lining the inside of the batten pocket. The splinters dig into the film much less than fabric.

If this is a frequent problem, buy a roll of 3m shrinkwrap or wrap the batten with some kind of rubberized tape (electrical tape, pipe wrap, etc). Both will contain a broken batten in most circumstances.

If you put the round end of the batten in a drill and set the drill on its back so you can operate it with your foot, you can wrap a batten in less than a minute. Any decent tape will stay on for the life of the sail.

The tape or shrinkwrap is surprisingly heavy though. For most sails a complete installation will add about 25% to the weight of the battens, or the equivalent of adding 1-2 battens. If you only break certain battens or break battens in a particular spot you can do a partial/ targeted installation with a lower weight penalty.

Cutting the battens out isn't a big deal on the rare instance where it is required. Lots of good instruction in this thread about pulling the battens or making the cut, if it comes to that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group