myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
Boston area newb --
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Eastern and Central USA & Canada
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
spookini



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 6:06 pm    Post subject: Boston area newb -- Reply with quote

Newb in Boston area, wanting to get into windsurfing but don't have the budget right now for all-new equipment. Looking to pickup a used/demo beginner board -- they're not easy to locate!

In terms of rig/sails, does anybody have any equipment they are looking to downsize? Thanks in advance. Hope I get some replies Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
WaterKook



Joined: 10 Apr 2000
Posts: 1711
Location: The Dude abides!!!!!

PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2010 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craigslist..... http://boston.craigslist.org/bmw/spo/1942037809.html
or....http://capecod.craigslist.org/spo/1883205682.html

_________________
www.Clew-View.com
[Jerry's World] www.waterkook.com
www.chathamwindandtime.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
mlaronde



Joined: 11 Jun 2001
Posts: 153

PostPosted: Sun Sep 12, 2010 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a very large board (1998 AHD Race Pro 310, 169l) which I will give away to anyone who is willing to fix it and use it. basically, the nose has completely broke off, but this thing is so long I don't think it is even needed. one way or another, you'll need to seal it off with some epoxy or whatever. it also has a small ding on the bottom which needs repair.

This board absolutely hauls ass. about 70cm wide. ideal sail is about 7.5, but it is wide and stable, and I learned how to plane and waterstart on it with much smaller sails. board is in Dedham, MA. fin not included for free, has tuttle box

Mike L
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CoderX



Joined: 15 May 2004
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

spookini wrote:
In terms of rig/sails, does anybody have any equipment they are looking to downsize?


Freebee: I have old 6.4 sail (199? sailworld volcano?). I haven't used it in ages. PM me if you need it.

Andrey
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spookini



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any tips on what type of rig I should try to put together? Mast type? This is alll new to me. Embarassed Thanks for any suggestions.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
greyghost



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 151

PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i think it depends on just how interested you are (ie how long you might keep the gear you buy) and what is your budget. There's lots of used gear around, usually it's a matter of being patient and checking Craigslist frequently.

In general, if you can afford and get a 'newer' (ie 5-6 year old board), wider style board, you'll progress faster. The bigger the better. Boards from the 90's and early 2000 tended to be longer and narrower. It's not that you can't learn on them, it's just harder and slower.

If you're starting out, getting a smaller sail would be better depending on your weight. Averge sized male - 160# or so, maybe a 5.0.
Larger = more power and more likely to plane, but also heavier and harder to learn on. Looking for an appropriate lenght carbon mast would be good. I think if you're just starting out and learning sail handling and not blasting along, doesn't matter if it's newer or an older sail, just not ancient. If you're looking at a sail that you might keep in the long run, you'd want a newer sail (ie <6 years old).

BTW I have an old 5.0 Neilpryde RAF sail that you're welcome to have.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spookini



Joined: 09 Sep 2010
Posts: 68

PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Next beginner's question: what % carbon mast is best bang-for-buck?

Assuming I will be uphauling 100% of the time (no beach or water starts yet), does hi-carbon (75%+) make a big difference? Is it worth spending the $$?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
npiankov



Joined: 14 Oct 2004
Posts: 82

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From my experience, most people don't stay in the beginner stage for very long. If you go sailing once a week, have reasonable coordination and are eager to learn, you'll be waterstarting within 1 season. The biggest question is whether you expect to sail a fair amount or if this is just once-in-a-while kind of hobby for you, where you'd go on rare occasions and may not sail for a couple of months during the season just because it doesn't work out with family etc. If you expect to sail just occasionally, I would go for 30% mast. On the other hand, if this is something you enjoy to the point where you expect to be on the water with regularity and are not cash-strapped, a higher-quality mast will make sense.

In my experience, I found there to be a big difference between 30% carbon and 55% carbon - can be really felt. The difference between 55% and 70-75% doesn't feel as big and you need to start thinking about durability at that %% (the only mast I ever broke was a nice 75% Fiberspar - got worn out in the boom area and snapped). Frankly, instead of getting 75%+ regular mast, I would advise getting a skinny (90-100% carbon) for about the same amount of money. Those are really nice and comfortable, easier to waterstart with, easier to do sail maneuvers with. Would last you forever too.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shreddbob



Joined: 31 Mar 1987
Posts: 358
Location: Hawaii

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It sounds like you have become interested in our sport. That's great. Welcome! But can you tell us if you've tried it at all yet? If not then you may want to "get your feet wet" a few times before thinking about purchasing anything. Lots of people give up before getting anywhere in this sport. A lesson is pretty much mandatory at first. Lessons and rentals available at several places:
http://www.best-of-cape-cod.com/windsurfing-cape-cod.html
After a lesson or two then you can rent beginner gear and head down to West Dennis Beach on the Cape at low tide in a light southerly wind and progress rapidly. This is a great spot because for several hours surrounding low tide you can stand pretty far from shore (waist to neck high). And it's free now too.

This weekend has perfect timing of low tide (mid afternoon) at the south side of the Cape (West Dennis). And no swells from hurricanes make it into this part of Nanutcket Sound so ignore all the sensationalized news reporting sure to come about Igor making it too dangerous to go to any beach anywhere... And there's a good chance of some light south or southwest sea breezes there at least one of the afternoons this weekend, maybe both days.
http://www.boatma.com/tides/Sep/Dennisport-Nantucket-Sound.html

Do you have a wetsuit? A roof rack for your car? Things to think about. You may get away without a wetsuit this weekend (though better to have one) but certainly not much longer. The rental shops may provide one. Being chilled out there and trying to learn is not a good mix. And of course there's that mandatory 45 minute swim back to shore dragging your gear behind you Shocked that all beginners end up experiencing--much safer in a wetsuit. And don't go in winds that will be blowing you offshore!!! (unless you have a good friend with a chase boat).
Bob
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
swmckay



Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 131

PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

npiankov wrote:
Frankly, instead of getting 75%+ regular mast, I would advise getting a skinny (90-100% carbon) for about the same amount of money. Those are really nice and comfortable, easier to waterstart with, easier to do sail maneuvers with. Would last you forever too.


What he said. Go for a high-carbon (> 90%) skinny. It'll be a bit more expensive up front, but in the Boston area, it should last about 50 years. And the light weight makes an enormous difference.

I own and like both Hot Sails Maui "Hot Rod Big Wave RDM" and the Ezzy masts; and I've rented the Neil Pryde X-Combats, and like them a lot, too. The Hot Rods and the Ezzys are pretty reasonably priced, too. And Neil Pryde Maui sometimes sells unlabelled X-Combats for ridiculously low prices. I bet that any modern > 90% carbon RDM is good, though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Eastern and Central USA & Canada All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group