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Want to confirm what board size to target...
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SS77



Joined: 27 Dec 2012
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:02 pm    Post subject: Want to confirm what board size to target... Reply with quote

This is a follow up to my previous post deciding between the freeride Shark 150, and JP xcite-ride 146.... etc...

I just want to be sure I am buying the right size board before I pull the trigger. I know i want an freeride board in the 130 - 150L range. To recap.. I am transitioning from an old fanatic long board. I will be sailing on man made lakes in the midwest. I weigh 175lbs (45 yrs old) I am confident with planning with the harness and use the footstraps, but cannot jibe or waterstart. So i will still need to uphaul. I consider myself to be an intermediate. On good days winds are 10-15, 10-20. Ocassionally the winds gust to 25 or 30, but this is rare.

The windsurf calculator lists my first short board to be a 130L based on my weight. If i purchase a 130L is it possible that I may not need to purchase a smaller board in the future? I know Bic states that their Techno 133 can be used in all kinds of conditions and may be the only board needed.

I rented a Core 148 a couple of weeks ago in FL and had a good time. I felt in control and didn't notice much of a difference from the standpoint of it requiring more skill than my old board.

Sorry for being long winded. I appreciate any input. Choosing windsurfing gear can get confusing. thanks!
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adywind



Joined: 08 Jan 2012
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, a freeride board between 130 and 140lt or approximately 70 cm wide can be the board you'll ever need for your weight on a lake . It will cover 0-30 mph wind with a number of sails and at least one smaller fin, since they come with the biggest recommended. You can expect to start planing around 15 mph wind with a 8.0 sail . You'll be able to uphaul it just fine. It may be little bit challenging at first, but on flat water you'll get used to it quickly .
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 1494

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SS77,

I think you are on the right track. However, there is NO one correct answer since there are so many variables. With that said, I would get a board that works with sails between 6.5 and 9.0 for the "lighter days". Eventually, when you have your water starts and gybes nailed, you will want a smaller board (90-110L with 4.5 to 6.5 sails) for the windy days.

I have sailed lakes for 30 years and have found that a 105 liter board for higher winds (20-30) is the most fun. Since our/your winds are variable and gusty, I like having a board that I can uphaul in the lulls or wind shadows. I weigh 168 lbs and the 105 is a little tippy for me to uphaul (flat water is easy, rough water is a little challenging), but skill level plays a huge role on what is or isn't uphaulable. Some guys my size can uphaul boards in the 80L range while others can't do it with 120 liters. It's practice that makes the difference.

For a time, having one board that does it all will work, but if you stick with sport and are committed, you will not be happy with only one board.
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dhmark



Joined: 04 Sep 2007
Posts: 216

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One decision point that may help would be what do you plan to have as your largest sail. There is a big jump in cost of getting a new 490 mast to handle sails larger than 7.5, as 7.5 tends to be the largest sail for a 460 mast. Big sails like carbon booms and more $$$. If you plan to get such large gear, a 146-150 L board handles such sails well and you should go this route. Get a smaller board later.
If you think you stop at 7.5, then a smaller 120-130 is an option (actually ideal for that size), but you get some extra planing at 146-150. I stop at 7.5 (hated big sails, got rid of 9.0), but get some extra days in using it on a BIC Techno 160. Next board down is Fanatic Cross 120, works fine with 7.5. dhmark
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coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 2011

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only use volume to choose a board based on the amount of chop I am going to sail in. I match a boards width, not volume, to the sail range I need based on wind speed.

How large are the lakes you sail at? A couple of hundred yards across or a couple of miles? Distance equals fetch and long fetch equals big chop. If you have to deal with big chop then volume is going to be an issue and you will not want 150 liters at your weight in 15-20 mph winds as the board will be hard to control on a reach and have a tendency to bounce out of jibes. If a small lake with little chop than you can get away with more volume.

You didnít state what size sails you have which would help you choose a board based on width. Do you already have a large sail, or do you plan on getting one. Dhmark pointed out sail size limits based on mast length but you can get 8+ sails built for a 460 which is what you will need at your weight for 10-15.

Coachg
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d0uglass



Joined: 28 May 2004
Posts: 1086
Location: Bonita Springs, Florida

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're getting to the point where your board choice is going to be more about the conditions than your skill level. I.e., you COULD ride a smallish board, but a biggish board might work better for your conditions...

130 liters would be perfect for 15 - 20 mph.

Minimum size uphaulable (112 liters?) would be perfect for > 20 mph.

As big as possible (150+ liters) would be best for < 15

Since you say you want to replace your longboard that probably means you want something that will work well in light winds. Though nothing will work as well in non-planing conditions as a longboard, a bigger shortboard will hold bigger sails and get you planing earlier.

So I think you should go with your original idea of getting a Shark 150 / 145 or a JP 146... or a Bic 148. They'll all be great in less than 20 mph, and you'll manage in 20-25 mph when you have to, at least until later on when you add a dedicated high wind board to your quiver.

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James' Blog: Windsurfing Equipment Size Calculator
http://jimbodouglass.blogspot.com/2010/11/updated-windsurf-calculator-online.html
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adywind



Joined: 08 Jan 2012
Posts: 236

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's not easy, is it?! The problem is that there is no simple answer. Take me for example: the summer of 2010 when I purchased my first short board I thought this will be the only board ill ever need, add 2 sails and ill be all set for life. Wrong! 3 seasons later I have 4 boards and 5 sails and my first kit is long gone. It's ridiculous! And regardless of what I'm telling my wife , I'm not done yet! Now I need an E150 to store and transport all the crap and eventually live in it once I get kicked out of home.Sad
On the other hand- I have budies who get by with one or two boards . Most of them are B&J junkies who don't get in unless its blowing at least 20 mph, there are few moderates with middle of the range freeride and freemove boards and there is one radical who buys at least 2 brand new boards and so many sails every year-he has a kit for every wind strength and water state.
Now what do you want? Unfortunately you can't know yet because as long as your skills improve you'll seek new challenge and maybe new equipment to take on it and for your skills to improve rapidly you'll need more equipment. It is espatialy frustrating if you have a fixed work schedule - most of the time the conditions are not ideal on your day off and you'll want to be prepared for almost anything. So take all the aspects into consideration and decide for yourself.
No mater what you choose in the end, make sure you have fun with it and convince your self that you made the right choice.
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rangerider



Joined: 19 Jul 2009
Posts: 157

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There have been a few similar threads lately and based on the recommendations most are making I am convinced that I am a worse sailor than I thought (and I didn't think to much of my ability to begin with). I spend a lot of time slogging with my JP xcite ride 145L on the lakes I sail. It is a good board and I'm happy with it, it is really fun when the power is there but it does bounce in chop and through gybes a bit. I would love to have a 120L board for high wind days - I'd probably get to use it a few times a year - which is why I won't buy one until the xcite-ride bites the dust. I have two longboards and went back to the longboard a lot after buying the JP. If you go too small you will probably regret it more than if you are a bit too big for the windy days. The caveat here is that my abilities may require me to use a bit bigger board than a better sailor would need. Most people around here are on formula kit though.
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SS77



Joined: 27 Dec 2012
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Fri Jun 21, 2013 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This was extremely informative!! I want to thank everyone for all of your replies. I really appreciate this forum. You do not get unbiased information like this from any surf shop.

I sail on two lakes. One is relatively small 15 minutes from my work which i have flexibility to jump over there in the afternoon when winds are good. Chop is not a concern there. The other lake I sail at is the largest man made lake in IL (Carlyle). The swells can get large there. In general I tend to only windsurf when winds are gusting above 15 mph. I am thinking I will need to purchase new sails since mine are extremely old. Windsurfing is exhilarating!
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PeconicPuffin



Joined: 07 Jun 2004
Posts: 1221

PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I were in your situation (and I weigh 165) my board of choice would be a Techno 153 or equivalent. It will be bouncy when the winds and swell are strong, but given your lack of waterstarting you'll want something larger than 130 liters beneath you when you're uphauling in bouncing water. (Later on when your skills improve that won't be true.)

Also, in my limited experience with lake sailing the wind can shift substantially or shut down, and for shlogging you'll want something larger than 130 to get you home.

Then when you learn to waterstart get a 95-100 liter board for higher wind days.

.02

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Michael
http://www.peconicpuffin.com
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