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Stich and Glue construction: suggestions for material?
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dvCali



Joined: 23 Aug 2007
Posts: 454

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 3:36 pm    Post subject: Stich and Glue construction: suggestions for material? Reply with quote

I am starting a a couple of windsurfing/SUP projects and because they are mostly prototype I would like to use a stitch and tape method.

Question is what material to use. Regular Plywood is obviously way too heavy, and I want a material that is flexible and thin, it could be very thin because I can always reinforce with fiberglass cloth. What can I use?

Thinner Plywood (lite plywood? where to find for cheap?)

Veneer? (tends to be expensive)

Fiberglass panels?

Or?

Dimensions are going to be 2 to 4 feet long by at most 30 inches (oh my gods! I am not using metric!!!!)
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Boardhead1



Joined: 01 Mar 2011
Posts: 58
Location: St Petersburg Fl

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your making 2' - 4' X30 " proto types just use door skin plywood material from home depot. Then look at the better ply woods or veneers for the real board. Cheaper that way.
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dvCali



Joined: 23 Aug 2007
Posts: 454

PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boardhead1 wrote:
If your making 2' - 4' X30 " proto types just use door skin plywood material from home depot. Then look at the better ply woods or veneers for the real board. Cheaper that way.

Thank you for the suggestion. A search for door skin brings up 1/8" plywood at home depot. That would probably work, although ideal would be 1/16", or 1.5 mm. I am wondering if to actually make the panels in fiberglass ... and there it is with a neat glass trick http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmwGCfwC8vs
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 5888

PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2014 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great video tutorial. While not identified, it would be helpful to know what kind of resin was used to sustain the flexibility in the created sheet product. Also, the amount of catalyst used was far to sketchy given the my experience with polyester and epoxy resins, especially with the importance of volume and temperature factors with the former.

I like the idea of working with composite materials. Using birch plywood shaped panels and working with carbon, Texalium fiberglass and polyester resin, I created a high tech modern look in my two bathrooms and kitchen remodels, to include trim elements throughout my place.

It would be interesting to see what you come up with in your project
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 1798
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Mon Jan 20, 2014 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler wrote:
Great video tutorial. While not identified, it would be helpful to know what kind of resin was used to sustain the flexibility in the created sheet product. Also, the amount of catalyst used was far to sketchy given the my experience with polyester and epoxy resins, especially with the importance of volume and temperature factors with the former.

I like the idea of working with composite materials. Using birch plywood shaped panels and working with carbon, Texalium fiberglass and polyester resin, I created a high tech modern look in my two bathrooms and kitchen remodels, to include trim elements throughout my place.

It would be interesting to see what you come up with in your project

I would like to see some pics of that (your work), beings that I'm a remodeler by profession.
Always looking for something new.

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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 565
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No disrespect intended, but why use stitch and clue when you can do everything by vacuum bagging and have a much better chance of controlling the weight and strength of the finished product. If it is because you don't have access to a vacuum pump, then you should know it is fairly easy to build a very reliable vacuum pump for about $175. As for the vacuum bags, it is fairly easy to build your own using clear vinyl and double stick Superseamstick tape.

I watched the video and thought it was interesting but extremely rudimentary. Doing it well and right is not very much more difficult. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILiZtg45mjk&feature=related
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Windnc



Joined: 22 Apr 2005
Posts: 71

PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 7:39 am    Post subject: Stitch and Glue Construction Reply with quote

Many stitch and glue constructed lightweight and paddle powered watercraft such as kayaks, canoes and even SUP use Okume marine plywood. The usual thickness is 3mm - 4mm and you can get thicker pieces to for frames, ribs, bulkheads etc.

It is a high quality and lightweight plywood constructed with waterproof glues so it holds up well. It also does not contain void or hollow spaces that are often found in thin door panel plywood such a luan. Okume also looks beautiful when covered with glass, clear epoxy and varnish. You can easily paint it as well.

There are various places you can get Okume but check out Chesapeake Lightcraft at: http://www.clcboats.com/" They sell it in 4'x8 sheets and may also do 4'x4' too.

Good luck

Chuck
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dvCali



Joined: 23 Aug 2007
Posts: 454

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thombiz wrote:
No disrespect intended, but why use stitch and clue when you can do everything by vacuum bagging and have a much better chance of controlling the weight and strength of the finished product. If it is because you don't have access to a vacuum pump, then you should know it is fairly easy to build a very reliable vacuum pump for about $175.

I watched the video and thought it was interesting but extremely rudimentary. Doing it well and right is not very much more difficult. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILiZtg45mjk&feature=related

Ages ago I did build a vacuum pump with a refrigerator compressor that eventually gave up the ghost. I am sure it can be done better (how?), and I do have quite a lot of left over bagging supplies that I could use.

But my projects fall into the category of sort of crazy "board additions". I am building a front "race-board" prow to my SUP, and detachable rails to one of my windsurfs. So the idea was to use the simplest possible technique, with no complications because the additions have a really good chance not to work at all.

After following the suggestions, looking around and not finding much below 3mm, I am thinking to (1) build instead a wood cast around the area I want to "add to", (2) fill the cast with expanding foam, (3) shape it, (4) glass it and provide the attachments to the original board ... wish me luck!

To regain familiarity with the whole mess I just cut the nose off my RRD 74 Twisted Evil, straight cut, glued on rigid urethane foam (Last-A-foam), shape and tomorrow is glassing time.

Great videos from Nelson, he makes it look easy ... if only it was!


Last edited by dvCali on Wed Jan 22, 2014 7:37 pm; edited 4 times in total
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slinky



Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 429
Location: Old Saybrook Ct.

PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those who are interested in vacuum bagging need look no further than your town dump. Old refrigerator compressors, if still functioning properly make a good vacuum pump. Mine cost nothing and works fine.
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outcast



Joined: 04 May 2004
Posts: 2406

PostPosted: Thu Jan 23, 2014 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.clcboats.com/?gclid=CMK_mPDnlLwCFW1nOgodxDUATQ
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