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LUCARO



Joined: 07 Dec 1997
Posts: 495

PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 2015 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Much of the stuff I needed I purchased at my local WestMarine. The divinycell had to be sourced from a more specialized shop.

I switched over to (http://www.resinresearch.net/) epoxy as it is meant to stable in the UV and does not need to be painted (I was repairing a Sup with a clear finish at the time).

But West Systems Expoxy seems to be pretty popular and easy to find.
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boardsurfr



Joined: 23 Aug 2001
Posts: 1212

PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 2015 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler (and others), thanks for the encouragement. I have to admit that fear of nose damage was one of the things that kept me from trying a few things (like committing to Grubby tries). Not the only thing, but one factor.

Even though, it seems we're at Fox at least once a year to drop of boards for nose repairs. It will be nice being able to do this at home.

For years, I have used the double-foam nose protector. It has not prevented all nose damage, but I am pretty sure that it has at least reduced it in major crashes. The current "ding" is the worst I have ever had, but it definitely was not from the worst crash. I'm seriously toying with the idea of making a "crush this instead" throw-away nose protector, using some foam, fiberglass, and contact cement.

And while the board is delaminating under the foot straps, it still sails perfectly fine, without any signs of water entry. Expert consensus is that I've had too many hard landings. I had about 180 session on this board, so that comes down to about $10/session. If the repair costs $60 and I get 7 sessions out of it, I call it a win. That does not even count whatever I learned doing the repair. I'm sure the second repair will be better than the first.

I have already ordered a replacement board (exactly the same board, slightly used). I don't know the price yet, but I can have it shipped any time I need it. So I recon I really should try a few loops on the old board once the nose is fixed!
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rigitrite



Joined: 19 Sep 2007
Posts: 492
Location: Kansas City

PostPosted: Tue Jul 21, 2015 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First off, you buy 2 yds of glass cloth, because you bought 1/2 gal. of resin + hardener, and you're planning on doing multiple repairs of unknown nature....in the future. You save on shipping and materials over buying just enough for the one repair. You can use this stuff to fix anything. I've built interior parts for my cars, fixed wood rot damage on window sills, and reinforced a bathroom sub-floor that had water damage before I put down the concrete board and laid the tile. You'll be glad you had plenty of extra cloth....and it never goes bad (the cloth that is). The uncured resin will last a year or two.

You can fix the delamination under the foot straps pretty easily; you don't even need a vacuum bag! (although a vacuum bag is pretty awesome for this repair).
1. remove the foot straps and any EVA over the delam and with a sharpie, outline the area you believe to be delaminated.
2. Get yourself a very large syringe with a big plastic tip. You'll be using this to inject resin.
3. Using a grid pattern, drill holes just deep enough to penetrate the laminate (about 1/8") using a drill stop. Drill the holes 1" apart at the cross sections of your grid and 1" apart around the outline of the delaminated area.
4. mix your resin w/hardener and using the syringe, inject it into the holes till it starts to come out of the holes around it. Keep going till resin is coming out all the holes.
5. Cover the whole mess with wax paper (you've taped off the sides to catch drips, right?) and cover the delam area with a couple sand bags to press it together.
6. Let cure and sand sand flat, then replace any EVA w/contact cement.
Done.

If done correctly, this will add very little weight to your board and should keep you going for some time.

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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 9491

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 3:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just some words of advise, fiberglass cloth tends to be hydroscopic, and as a result, it ultimately suffers in achieving a good bond and maximum adhesion in performance if it picks up too much moisture. I'm not against buying a good inventory for future use, but be cautious and store it well protected in a cool dry spot.

On the other hand, I've found that epoxy and hardener lasts a long time if it's keep in cool and reasonably air tight during storage. I've successfully used 15 year old epoxy without a problem.

As far as stabilizing a soft deck, it's a viable solution in some instances. Mike Zajicek injected a couple of my ML boards sustaining their life. In fact, I've been using one injected 1999 board for better than 9 years after being done. Of course, Mike makes incredibly strong and lightweight boards that are far superior to a Cobra finished product. They softened up in front of the rear straps, but the laminations never cracked or took on water.
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scargo



Joined: 19 May 2007
Posts: 394

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like this little repair kit. The pre-measured packets are easy to use, and the right size for small jobs. Even has a couple of different thickeners.

http://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-system--fiberglass-repair-kit-105-k-repair-kit--12954095
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U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 5071
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck with the ding.

How do you order a board and not know what the cost will be ?

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bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 967
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler wrote:
A The thought that you need 2 yards of fiberglass cloth for this repair is outlandish.


As rigrite said, you buy two yards because glass is cheap. The cost of shipping is equal to or greater than the cost of the actual glass, so you're better off buying roughly an amount that can be used with the amount of resin you buy.

Someone else recommended buying repair supplies at West Marine. In my experience, their prices are WAY higher than the online supply houses. Maybe OK if you are desperate for material right away, but if you can wait for shipping, online is much more reasonable.


swchandler wrote:
I have to admit to that I've never bought latex gloves for resin work, and I've done a lot of work over the last 10 years in my home remodel projects.


Every time I work with resin without using gloves, I am instantly reminded of why gloves are worth every penny. I can't stand getting sticky resin on my hands. Home Depot or even a pharmacy sell boxes of 50 or 100 gloves for a couple bucks. They make this type of work much more bearable.

sm
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Brian_S



Joined: 11 Jun 2005
Posts: 217
Location: SE Michigan

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While we're on this topic, anyone know where to get a small quantity of divincell? I don't need a 4' x 8' sheet. My ding is much smaller than Peter's.
Brian

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U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 5071
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Iam close to positive that Fiberglass Suppy will cut much smaller that the sheet,
You may need to call to place the order. They have a variety in different thickness.

Noah Marine, Jamestown Distributors are possibilities.
I have found core mat local but no d.cell.

Brian I have some small bits, but only 2 small sections in what I need for a project.

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boardsurfr



Joined: 23 Aug 2001
Posts: 1212

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2015 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought 4 yards of glass because the price per yard went down; 3 yards would have cost the same. I'll store it double-packed in tight containers. I had read about the water absorption issue, and was quite surprised to see open rolls of fiberglass at the local West Marine.

I checked the online places for epoxy. It's a lot cheaper at fiberglass supply than at West Marine .. until you add the shipping costs, and then it's about even. Pour foam is a different story - $120 at West Marine, $35 (+shipping) at fiberglass supply. The foam in the nose is pretty much broken through, so I'll rebuild it with 8 lb PU foam. I have been told that divinycell is not needed for nose repairs (by someone with lots of experience whom I trust). The board I build 30+ years ago had a PU core with a straight glass layup, and lasted many years. So I'll skip the divinycell for this repair.

I'll hold off on fixing the delamination for now. It's probably been there for a while. I never noticed it when sailing, only when I decided to practice some footwork on land. I might fix it in the future, after I got the new board. I have seen a nice delam repair video where they removed the top 1/2 inch of material, and replaced it with a divinycell sheet. That requires vacuum, though. I'm not yet ready to spend the extra money for a vacuum setup, perhaps in the future. Doing the repair this way might require removing and re-inserting the foot straps plugs, though. I'll research this more when the time comes. Maybe I won't do it - not sure I can get the garage warm enough in the winter (and it's pretty crowded with gear, anyway).

scargo, I saw the little repair kit. I like the idea, but the specs list only the fast hardener. I'll also need a bit more epoxy for this repair, I'm afraid.

U2, I'm buying the board unseen from someone I know and trust. He sets fair prices when he sells gear, and he's not the kind of person who would take advantage of you. I know how he sails, and what kind of stress he puts on the board. If something happens to the board before he ships it, I'm sure he'll adjust the price. I'm more comfortable doing it this way than I'd be buying a used board from someone I don't know, even if I could inspect the board first.
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