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cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 2271
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2016 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, since Steve referenced me, I guess I should comment. Indeed I have a late
model OO trifin full epoxy, and it is a more modern shape as well, at
7'9" and 79 ltrs, so wider and shorter than a traditional OO. Brian calls it a
Ripper Slasher. I've probably commented more than need be about it, so
you can search on that if you like. The ride is not quite as easy as a
traditional OO, but almost, and the range is better. It's also very surfy
and slashy. The traditional OOs would slash with the best, but with me
on one, it took more rider input to get a quick turn out of it. The modern
shape is plenty stable, but a good toe twitch will get you surfing a
tasty swell, and it's still an easy ride in pretty nuked out conditions.

I think I'd prefer the more modern shape until about 35MPH winds, then you
can't beat the traditional shape. This is also the 1st full epoxy ride I've tried
that didn't have a harsh ride, planform has a lot to do with that.

I don't think Brian has glassed in the side fins in about 15 years, but you
could probably order one that way (for whatever deranged reason). I have
to say that his trifins really work great in powered up conditions though,
and while I've tried the boards without the side fins, I don't like them as
much that way. I might also mention that if I were getting a smaller one
(don't really need that), I'd probably get it in polyrite. A little extra weight
isn't necessarily a bad thing when it's gusting over 40, and a closed cell
core is kind of like a warm fuzzy security blanket.

I'd buy another one in a heartbeat.

Maybe you should call him up and tell him what you have in mind. Just be
prepared for an earful.

Or, look for an older one at a swap, but most of them are usually ridden into the ground by their owners.

PM me if you want explicit details about the old or new shapes.

-Craig

swchandler wrote:
If you want a lighter epoxy board made from EPS or closed cell polystyrene foam, you can get those versions at a bit higher pricing. Regarding an epoxy version, I think that Craig (cgoudie1) can fill you in with a good report.
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underwood



Joined: 15 May 2010
Posts: 44

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2016 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I bought my first one last year and it has been awesome. I needed a high wind board and wound up getting something in between a ripper/slasher and old school. 7'9" and 23" wide. With his winter discount it was priced at almost half of a new production board. The best thing I can say about it is that it is fast, smooth, carves like a dream and I never have to think about the board while sailing it. I will be buying another one in the future. If you are honest about what you want and let him build it to fit that, not only will you not be disappointed, you will be thrilled!
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jingebritsen



Joined: 21 Aug 2002
Posts: 3314

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

a bit ironic, dontcha think, that the name OO should be applied to boards that excel in gorge conditions????

as long as one realizes that gusty conditions prevail in the gorge, and one should apply lots of sail power for the lulls, one should be happy to have a gorge board like that. NOTE: when i am in the ditch, and several people tell me they are on 4.2's and i watch them slog half the time, i know it's time for a 5.0 to 5.5 sail.... coming from my world, that's a happy rig. to lots there, they would rather sit on the river bank and moan.

another note: lotsa people fall in love with a board in the gorge or maui, buy one for home use and rarely end up using them. that's a southeast coast perspective.

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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19298

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jingebritsen wrote:
as long as one realizes that gusty conditions prevail in the gorge, and one should apply lots of sail power for the lulls, one should be happy to have a gorge board like that. NOTE: when i am in the ditch, and several people tell me they are on 4.2's and i watch them slog half the time, i know it's time for a 5.0 to 5.5 sail.

Totally agree. What they call "efficient sailing" I call work and a lot of lost shred time.

jingebritsen wrote:
Lotsa people fall in love with a board in the gorge or maui, buy one for home use and rarely end up using them. that's a southeast coast perspective.

Or the perspective anywhere if the venue and the sailor's attitude aren't ready for sinkers. New Mexico is one freaking WINDY place, gets some very gnarly terrain on the lakes (up to overhead), and two of its best WSing lakes have onshore launches, so sinkers were quite appropriate there if one accepted the occasional swim. But in its biggest lake in offshore winds, sinkers were a huge gamble. And that was in a very windy state; anywhere else and for less adventuresome sailing, flotation was key. When a mistake on a sinker meant an overnight stay on the far side, I opted for something in the 80-100 liter range ... and still got spooked sometimes.

When a buyer from some distant location shows an interest in one of the 70-80L wave boards I'm selling in the Gorge, he gets grilled about his home venues, aspirations, objectives, and skills. The right answers include:
I have access to onshore launches.
I enjoy high winds and want to take advantage of their bigger terrain and rougher conditions.
I do not want to sit out our few really windy days at home for lack of a suitable board.
I waterstart very reliably in any conditions and enjoy the hell out of solid 30 mph days in the Gorge.
Some swimming is fine with me and safe at home.
I know it's a gamble, and accept that. Heck, if I get a couple of good days a year on it at home, that's $150 well spent.

OK, I'll take your money.

I've gotten some GREAT feedback from some of those buyers. One realized it was a mistake, and another bought too BIG a board, so it all balanced out.
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U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 5071
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craig,
I remember something about the side fins, of course the very high cant,

And the box is different?

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NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 1227

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As always, lots of different ideas. That's a good thing. Thanks for the input.
Been doing this a very long time. The one thing I learned, a sinker is a lot of work. For my advanced years, I want a board on the dry side of sink/float.
Most places I sail these days, if its windy its also gusty. I think its time to give him a call......
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 9491

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your goal is take advantage of the livelier conditions at Arroyo Laguna, you won't be disappointed with an OO. The same would be true at Sherman Island.
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dhmark



Joined: 04 Sep 2007
Posts: 302

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I borrowed my brother's custom OO when I last went to the gorge. Compared to the appropriate rental boards, it was the smoothest chop-eating board I have ever sailed, by a huge margin. Needless to say, when he moved to Honolulu, he did not take it with him, as I suspect he felt that it would not be good for those lighter wind and wave sailing conditions on Oahu.
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westender



Joined: 02 Aug 2007
Posts: 1170
Location: Portland / Gorge

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you know Brian's history of surfing and shaping in Hawaii I think the name is appropriate. http://www.openocean.com/about.html


jingebritsen wrote:
a bit ironic, dontcha think, that the name OO should be applied to boards that excel in gorge conditions????
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19298

PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2016 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NOVAAN wrote:
a sinker is a lot of work. For my advanced years

IIRC, I'm a little older than you, and recently sold my last little bitty board because my forearms and patience are both feeling their age and because Gorge winds the last few years are transitioning from frequent fairly smooth multi-day thermals to predominantly drive-by, briefer, gustier frontals. The biggest board I use is still technically a sinker @ 95L, but my smallest is now 68L and is reserved for those few full nuke days each summer when my 3.2 is consistently hammered and anything bigger is too much work (even that 68 is carefully hand-picked for an ultra-smooth ride). Last time I tried one of my everyday 65L Bonzers it was just too much work anywhere near the shoreline; I sold it to a much younger man. Meat & potatoes gusty 4.0 to 5.2 now = 80L for me. It's a sinker, but actually sinks only when I'm stopped ... at which point I'd rather be swimming or snacking anyway. I don't know how that maps into Brian's size range.

Craig echoed my sentiments of a decade or two ago with his "This is also the 1st full epoxy ride I've tried that didn't have a harsh ride, planform has a lot to do with that". I disliked carbon boards and many epoxies for that reason until I stumbled across a one-off carbon-hulled unobtanium-cored Gorge board with twice the intended vee (computer input error). Rode like silk. Since then I've owned and loved dozens of carbon and/or epoxy boards as long as they ride smoothly, a plenty do -- especially many wave boards. Turns out that as Craig implied, the shape matters much more than the "glue" that holds it together. There's something pretty magical about a 12- or 13-pound board with incredible turning and a silky ride at high speed in nasty chop.
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