myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
Long Board vs Transition Board (180L)
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
LakeSurf



Joined: 01 Jul 2015
Posts: 81

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 6:52 am    Post subject: Long Board vs Transition Board (180L) Reply with quote

I'm a 180lb newbie (been out about 8 times) and have been borrowing Motion HiFly 290cm long, 90cm wide, 219 liters board. The board feels super stable, but heavy and sluggish. I typically sail in light winds (12 mph or so) -- on average about once a month, but hope to do future trips to the coast for stronger winds.

What do you think would be better for me -- something like a JP Austraila Funster 180L or a long wide board?

I know a lot of people love the Kona One, but I haven't been able to find one used and don't want to break the bank of tons of gear that I'm not able to use a whole lot. And with my experience with the HiFly, I feel like I'm ready for a smaller board than 200L.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gvogelsang



Joined: 09 Nov 1988
Posts: 433

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 7:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you like to sail in light winds around 12, a longboard makes a lot of sense. With the dagger board and longer water line, you can explore upwind and downwind.

A short board really only comes into its own element in planing conditions - which start at 15 for most.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19378

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plus ... many longboards are fast when planing (e.g., Mistral Superlight, Fanatic Ultra Cat) and any of them will provide the single most valuable key to progress: TOW.

Time On the Water.

It took many of us a decade to learn how to plane through jibes, and that included sailing every dang day a leaf moved anywhere in a windy home state plus frequent trips to exotic windy places.

This sport only LOOKS easy. In fact, it -- especially planing through jibes -- may be the biggest challenge you ever face in your life, as it has been for many of us. Fortunately, today's learning environment (the net, lessons, beginner boards, etc.) will make it easier.

Not easy; easiER.

I see scores of WSers every busy day who have sailed the hottest sailing spot in North America every year for decades and STILL can not plane through their jibes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LakeSurf



Joined: 01 Jul 2015
Posts: 81

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies. A typical day may average 12mph but have 18 mph gusts. What dimensions for a long board should I look at? Is there a volume/weight that you would say is too big for someone who's getting the basics (harness, beach starts)? With the HiFly most of the time I think this thing is heavy and slow and wish I had something faster. But other times (yesterday random day with 30mph gusts) I definitely appreciated the volume.

I've been looking for over a year and all the local used stuff I see is old narrow which I know is not good for learning.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LakeSurf



Joined: 01 Jul 2015
Posts: 81

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Would a Naish Kailua 230 be better than the JP 180? I'm just wondering if it's going to feel like a barge out there.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 2801

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Naish Kailua is an outstanding beginner board. We use them at my school. They are tough, long, have soft decks & can float a house. The problem is they are heavy. Try finding a longboard around 70 cm wide & 11-12 feet long which is a great option for 12 mph gusting to 18. Any old long board will work for you now to get you TOW.

As you get better you can decide what route to take. Modern longboard, windsup, large freeride, large slalom, formula or foil. Any would work for the wind at your location assuming your elevation is close to sea level. If at a high lake say 6-7,000 feet I'm afraid even a formula is going to struggle to get on a plane in 12 mph.

Coachg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
U2U2U2



Joined: 06 Jul 2001
Posts: 5080
Location: Shipsterns Bluff, Tasmania. Colorado

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Above post by coachg is sound advise .i don't see why looked for a used board to restrict it to one brand, others will do the same.

TOW, time on the water would be the objective I would persue.
So a long board, that aren't what I call wide, but with a center fin retractable.
VS a long short board of say 310, which is a long short board.


The weight you mention comes with size and the skin on the board which is resistant to breakage .

The smaller size you go ,NOW, the steeper your learning curse will be.

Irregardless of these you pick, you will need a smaller board for higher winds, along will al the associated kit, sails, masts........

_________________
K4 fins
4Boards....May the fours be with you

http://www.k4fins.com/fins.html
http://4boards.co.uk/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LUCARO



Joined: 07 Dec 1997
Posts: 501

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Either one of these would be a great investment, if you have to buy new. They both can rip in higher winds but are good learning boards. If I was mostly cruising with no hope of higher winds I might lean towards the 11'8" with the centerboard.

Exocet windsup 10'

http://www.exocet-original.com/wind-sup10.php

https://vimeo.com/160901338

Exocet windsup 11'8"

http://www.exocet-original.com/wind-sup118.php

https://vimeo.com/141053681
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 1240

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Again and again and again the same question. Everyone has his or her opinion. Mine is get a Kona one... Does everything well and it will be a keeper for life...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 19378

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2016 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LakeSurf wrote:
1. Is there a volume/weight that you would say is too big for someone who's getting the basics (harness, beach starts)?

2. I've been looking for over a year and all the local used stuff I see is old narrow which I know is not good for learning.

1. No. The bigger it is, the more TOW you can get.

2. Sez who ... Starboard? Narrow longboards worked fine for literally millions of newbies. Sure, a Starboard START may be better for beginners, but a classic longboard can remain fun for decades in the light breezes you're citing and can be bought for peanuts. A Kona is more versatile, but will cost watermelons, not peanuts.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Windsurfing Discussion All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group