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Getting into the Footstraps
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gvogelsang



Joined: 09 Nov 1988
Posts: 432

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeff,

Thanks for the report!
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konajoe



Joined: 28 Feb 2010
Posts: 491

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sometimes, I feel that the importance of getting in the straps is over blown. I've seen lots of folks schlogging because there forcing themselves to stand too far back on the board. Being in the straps isn't universally right.

My approach is to have my feet in the right spots. When I step on one or the other or both, in they go. But it's dependent on conditions.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 18540

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 9:42 am    Post subject: Re: Apologies to Fanatic Shark Reply with quote

jirvin_4505 wrote:
The stability of the GO 155 has me thinking I should stop having so much fun on the Shark and practice my carve gybes on the GO as it is much more forgiving with blown maneuvers? More time on the board! Less in the water.

There are people who are willing to sacrifice fun in the quest for skill progression, but I'm not among them. Sure, they progress more rapidly, but since learning to carve planing jibes takes most people years, that's a LOT of fun cast aside. It's not like we can't still work on jibes (and sail handling and harnesses and early planing and quick waterstarts and footstraps and stance and equipment adjustments and chop reading and ride quality and board handling and many more skills) while maximizing our fun. I tried jibing every couple of minutes (small lakes) on boards from >12 feet/240 liters to 9 feet/100 L for many years, and until my equipment and related skills and conditions were ready, I wasn't even close to planing all the way through my jibes (no access to lessons or good tutorials back then). Then on literally one day I ripped off dozens of them on my smallest gear.

From then on my jibing always progressed most rapidly (according to me and to observers) as my gear got smaller and more maneuverable. After all, a planing jibe IS a maneuver, a very complex one.

YMMV, especially if your goal is to maximize your skill progression at the expense of fun and adrenaline. The choice is highly personal.
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boardsurfr



Joined: 23 Aug 2001
Posts: 1038

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 10:51 am    Post subject: Re: Apologies to Fanatic Shark Reply with quote

PeconicPuffin wrote:

1. Park your mast foot in the middle of the mast track and forget about it for a year. Continue to develop your skills and general ability so that...a year (or two) from now, you adjust your mast track to tune your gear rather than to compensate for technique skills that you don't yet fully have. This will improve your learning now and gear performance later.


I disagree. Put the mast foot at the most comfortable position. It's actually pretty good that you can feel a difference in how the board handles when you change the position. The "correct" position depends on the sail, fin, conditions, preference, and skills, and rarely is the middle position. General rules are nothing more than an initial guideline. The only valid argument for leaving it in the middle position is that it's more likely to be somewhat close to the "correct" position (at most 1/2 track length off, and usually less).

As your technique improves, reevaluate the mast foot position from time to time.
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PeconicPuffin



Joined: 07 Jun 2004
Posts: 1685

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 12:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Apologies to Fanatic Shark Reply with quote

boardsurfr wrote:
The only valid argument for leaving it in the middle position is that it's more likely to be somewhat close to the "correct" position (at most 1/2 track length off, and usually less).


That's one argument (one I agree with). The other is incorrect mast track positioning can function as a crutch, compensating for technique or rigging errors. Do what's comfortable? BFF is comfortable. And it's a dead end.

There are a number of threads in the forum right now where sailors who are not comfortable in the foot straps are trying to solve their issues with gear tweaks. I think it's is a mistake. Until stance, sheeting in and planing in both foot straps are reasonably solid, I think tweaking the mast foot is a distraction and a mistake, and slows down the learning process.

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http://www.peconicpuffin.com
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 18540

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

konajoe wrote:
Sometimes, I feel that the importance of getting in the straps is over blown. I've seen lots of folks schlogging because there forcing themselves to stand too far back on the board. Being in the straps isn't universally right.

My approach is to have my feet in the right spots. When I step on one or the other or both, in they go. But it's dependent on conditions.


I agree maybe 80%, at least on boards under about 100L. The exceptions, it seems to me, are when that one small step back and into the straps, raking the sail a bit further back, and weighting the harness and mast foot to compensate for the extra tail weighting by leveling the nose accelerate me onto a plane rather than worsening the slog. Knowing when to do that successfully comes with a blend of TOW, experimentation, the terrain, a gust, a pump if required, and luck.
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jirvin_4505



Joined: 07 Jul 2015
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@isobars
>There are people who are willing to sacrifice fun in the quest for skill progression, but I'm not among them. Sure, they progress more rapidly, but since learning to carve planing jibes takes most people years, that's a LOT of fun cast aside. It's not like we can't still work on jibes (and sail handling and harnesses and early planing and quick waterstarts and footstraps and stance and equipment adjustments and chop reading and ride quality and board handling and many more skills) while maximizing our fun
>

Clarification...
I'm much more at the just staying on the board stage.

Carve gybe - I can only dream Smile

I'm trying to break a long term habit of hopping off the board at the end of long runs - this habit is reducing my TOW

Our groups of intermediates have started logging and posting tracks - the feedback is usefull. I noticed that I was over rotating on my slow gybes.

What more has become startling obvious is that my mates are getting 20kms whereas I'm getting 10kms in the same session. I've got to pull back a bit and get security on the board happening.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 18540

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jirvin_4505 wrote:
I'm trying to break a long term habit of hopping off the board at the end of long runs - this habit is reducing my TOW.

But look what it's dong for your waterstarts! Smile

It's also impeding your progress towards reliable subplaning jibes and tacks. The primary reason/time I deliberately jump in the water is when I can't plane, am on a board too small to slog comfortably (somewhere near 100L), and trust the wind to resume before I really need to be somewhere else. I already know how to slog, so I don't need to practice it; I just hate doing it and my lousy balance is getting worse, not better. At your stage, every bit of TOW is vital. At my age and medical status, energy conservation matters more.
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grantmac017



Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 488

PostPosted: Thu May 11, 2017 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jirvin_4505 wrote:
@isobars
>There are people who are willing to sacrifice fun in the quest for skill progression, but I'm not among them. Sure, they progress more rapidly, but since learning to carve planing jibes takes most people years, that's a LOT of fun cast aside. It's not like we can't still work on jibes (and sail handling and harnesses and early planing and quick waterstarts and footstraps and stance and equipment adjustments and chop reading and ride quality and board handling and many more skills) while maximizing our fun
>

Clarification...
I'm much more at the just staying on the board stage.

Carve gybe - I can only dream Smile

I'm trying to break a long term habit of hopping off the board at the end of long runs - this habit is reducing my TOW

Our groups of intermediates have started logging and posting tracks - the feedback is usefull. I noticed that I was over rotating on my slow gybes.

What more has become startling obvious is that my mates are getting 20kms whereas I'm getting 10kms in the same session. I've got to pull back a bit and get security on the board happening.


If you are on a board you can uphaul then a tack (in flat water) should be something you can do with confidence. Nothing else will keep you upwind am quite so well.
Once you have those nailed then go for gybes. As Iso says failure is just a chance to progress other skills.
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PeconicPuffin



Joined: 07 Jun 2004
Posts: 1685

PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 6:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jirvin_4505 wrote:

I'm trying to break a long term habit of hopping off the board at the end of long runs - this habit is reducing my TOW

Our groups of intermediates have started logging and posting tracks - the feedback is usefull. I noticed that I was over rotating on my slow gybes.


I learned to windsurf in a similar environment. The goal was to get on the board, hook in, get in the straps, rip for a mile or two, then fall in, kick the board in the opposite direction, waterstart and go back. After two years I met my first windsurfers from outside that group. They could tack and jibe, and they didn't sail for five+ minutes at a time in one direction. If you want to get beyond sailing in a straight line you need to attempt lots of transitions. You will get wet. There will be Time In The Water.

Don't get stuck in a rut. Tack and jibe. A great thing about pursuing transitions is you can practice them in light winds (nonplaning conditions).

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http://www.peconicpuffin.com
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