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grantmac017



Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 340

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm still confused as to why you aren't on that Rocket with enough sail to be planing at least half the time.
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NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 920

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because he wants to progress and develop skills that will allow him to go places and do things in windsurfing like high wind or waves or freestyle. One my challenge one self to get better.
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gregnw44



Joined: 23 Jul 2008
Posts: 685
Location: Seattle, Wa

PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding the OP asking about, if there's an issue with his old shortboard and his new-ish sail...

His Mistral Naish, isn't an "old shortboard"... it might be older than his Tabou... but it's not "that" old (late 90's?).
And regarding the mast track placement... it's NOT far forward, like an "old shortboard" (80's) would be.

And yes, it's a good drill to go out in light wind on a shortboard you can balance on (which he can easily, at his light weight on a 110L board). It's important to learn the subtle balance positions, this drill teaches. But since he also has a bigger shortboard, it's also a good drill to spend time planing on that... so he can get better at strap use, jibing, using bigger sails, etc.

Lastly, if his 110L Mistral Naish does have a mast-track a few inches forward of his Tabou... that "would help him to stay downwind (not round-up)" when slogging.

All the good tips have been given... great advice from everyone... but it takes time. Whenever you go down a board size, you are really starting over again, in many ways.
Be patient... keep at it... everyone goes through the same progression.
In a year, you'll make subtle moves automatically... and wonder why it was ever tough to keep from rounding-up, before Smile

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Greg
Longboarding since '81
Shortboarding since '84
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grantmac017



Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 340

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My theory is that nature will provide plenty of slogging opportunities without rigging specifically for it.
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bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 903
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 5:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

grantmac017 wrote:
My theory is that nature will provide plenty of slogging opportunities without rigging specifically for it.


EXACTLY!

Why would anyone want to practice slogging? Windsurfing is supposed to be fun - plane as often as you can and have no fear, the slogging will come....

sm
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rgomez



Joined: 13 Dec 2012
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is an old 1990s board in quite good condition. While my 125l rocket is great for all winds I do want to force myself to adjust to different board types especially ones that are challenging.

From the mark on the mast track it looks like the previous owner had the mast right up front.



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Wind-NC.com



Joined: 30 May 2007
Posts: 930
Location: Formerly Cape Hatteras, now Burlington, VT!

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is nothing wrong with practicing schlogging. On the high end of the performance spectrum, there are tons of days that I never would have been able to get out in the waves had I NOT practiced schlogging my wave boards in flat water first. Take a trip to Ho'okipa and you'll see 75+% of the pros bobbing around on small gear waiting for waves (unless it's a rare nuking day with wind all the way to the inside). Schlogging is a skill.

As far as avoiding rounding up goes, technique wise, you want to start from the feet up:

1) feet in an "L" shape with front foot up near/next to/pushing on the mast base, facing forward. Back foot not too far behind but across the centerline of the board.

2) Ankles loose and knees super bent and butt low to the board if you're really having trouble. If you're under control you can stand up straight with an upright stance and weight over the board (not pulling on the sail for balance). Front leg straight, back leg with slight bend at the knee, weight mostly on your back foot if it is in front of the footstraps, or more mixed between the feet if your back foot is behind the front straps.

2) hips opened up towards the mast base/nose (not facing dead downwind straight across the board)

3) shoulders parallel with hips. Probably at a 45 degree angle across the board, give or take.

4) both hands further back on the boom

5) "Sail forward towards the nose" is not the whole story. It is more effective to bring the mast across the windward rail of the board, and sheet in from there. You can probably see the nose of the board through the sail's window if you have the rig in the right place.

If your hips aren't opened up towards the nose of the board, it will be awkward to put the sail in the correct position. If your body IS facing more forward towards the nose, it will be easy to put the sail in the right spot.

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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 2871

PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No real criticism of Wind-NC.com but..........

Foot position depends on board float and wind. Slogging a sinker in very light wind = what Wind-NC said. As the wind and or the board volume increase, then the feet can begin moving back behind the mast.

The smallest board I currently sail is 96L and I weigh 170. If the wind is 5mph plus, I can keep the feet behind the mast. If it drops below 5, then the front foot must move up, a little in front of the mast (back foot moves too).

The lake sailing I occasionally do has highly variable winds. Last week 0-30 mph, and the 96L board and a 4.5 sail was a pain when the wind hit 0-2. Which means I fell in and had to wait about 12-15 minutes for wind to water start. 10 minutes later I am overpowered in a gust over 30. I usually don't use the 96L board on the lake because of the above problem. Normally, I am on a 105L board which is much more forgiving while slogging. Due to the strong wind, I gave the smaller board a try. Most of the time it was great.
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bred2shred



Joined: 02 May 2000
Posts: 903
Location: Jersey Shore

PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To each his own, I suppose.

I've been windsurfing for over 20 years now and I learned the first time I ever planed that (at least for me) planing rocks, and schlogging sucks...

Ever since that time, I've always picked my gear and rigged with the goal of trying to get planing - regardless of whether I'm sailing on a lake, bay, or ocean. Without a doubt there have been countless times where I've had the wind drop and had to schlog back in, so I would consider myself a fairly proficient schlogger. But I can't think of any time I've intentionally rigged small gear just to practice schlogging because - as grantmac noted, nature will provide plenty of opportunities for practicing.

If you follow the standard rules of not sailing in off-shore wind and not sailing out farther than you're willing to swim or walk back, then being a less than expert schlogger really shouldn't be an issue and as with everything, your skills will grow with TOW.

sm
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 2871

PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you do sail in gusty conditions (big lulls) or if there is the possibility of dying wind, a good rule of thumb is be on a board that you can uphaul. Better than dragging your gear while swimming a 1/2 mile or even a quarter mile. Practicing uphauling a small board is worth the effort.

In my above post, that's why I almost always use a 105L board in my gusty lake conditions. Uphauling is somewhat easy. The 96L board is more challenging.
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