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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 4696

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler wrote:
Despite all of the claimed negatives, California is the most populous state in the Union. When you think about it, that kind of says that the negatives really don't matter.


It's 2/3 of the west coast. It's a beautiful place for sure. Sadly it's best days are in the rear view mirror thanks to liberals and all their airhead ideas..
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 6554
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NP wrote:
I'd rather live in Toronto than New York, Washington DC, Chicago, to name a few. Those three are total $hitholes in my opinion.

Toronto is a great city...NP...agree there.
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 6554
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mat-ty wrote:
swchandler wrote:
Despite all of the claimed negatives, California is the most populous state in the Union. When you think about it, that kind of says that the negatives really don't matter.


It's 2/3 of the west coast. It's a beautiful place for sure. Sadly it's best days are in the rear view mirror thanks to liberals and all their airhead ideas..

It wouldn't be a matty post without blaming the liberals for everything under the sun....
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 4696

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boggsman1 wrote:
mat-ty wrote:
swchandler wrote:
Despite all of the claimed negatives, California is the most populous state in the Union. When you think about it, that kind of says that the negatives really don't matter.


It's 2/3 of the west coast. It's a beautiful place for sure. Sadly it's best days are in the rear view mirror thanks to liberals and all their airhead ideas..

It wouldn't be a matty post without blaming the liberals for everything under the sun....


The truths the truth...sorry. Big hearts and little brains Laughing Laughing Laughing
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5076
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Ca. is a brilliant state, a sanctuary state, illegals welcome, a state that has no concept of budgets, or even safety. What's next, serve a straw and go to jail?
This state, my home state, is an embarrassment.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

California's bullet train (and biggest boondoggle) is over budget by billions
1-19-18

It’s billions of dollars over budget and seven years behind schedule, and appears to have no plausible way of living up to its goal of getting riders across the state in three hours or less.
Welcome to what’s arguably the nation’s largest infrastructure project and California’s biggest boondoggle.
The highly hyped bullet train has been a challenge from the start. No one thought it would be technically, financially and politically easy, but the way the project has been mishandled has some Californians fed up and demanding answers.

Just this week, the California High-Speed Rail Authority, the organization charged with overseeing construction, reported that the cost of the first segment had dramatically risen – again.

“The worst-case scenario has happened,” admitted Roy Hill, lead consultant on the project.

Since its start, this hot-mess express of a project has been plagued by delays and has blown through every single budget estimate imaginable. And it’ll likely cost the state and taxpayers more in the coming months and years.
Much more.
“The so-called bullet train is a solution in search of a problem that is plagued by billions of dollars in cost overruns and fiscal mismanagement,” San Diego City Councilman Mark Kersey told Fox News. “The billions being wasted on this boondoggle could have been invested in our current infrastructure needs, such as water storage, flood control, highways and bridges.”
This week’s updated cost estimate -- to complete just the first phase - a 119-mile segment in the Central Valley - has ballooned to $10.6 billion. That’s a jaw-dropping 77 percent increase from initial estimates, 36 percent higher than forecasts from a year ago.
When California voters in 2008 narrowly approved $10 billion in bond as seed money for the high-speed rail development, they were told the total cost would be about $43 billion.
Fresh estimates put it now at $67 billion.

Brian Kelly, head of the State Transportation Agency, was appointed this week to run the High-Speed Rail Authority. He told The New York Times that even though the project has “mammoth opposition,” he has “never seen a single project that would have such a transformative impact as this one.”
Other supporters reason that the project should continue because billions of dollars have already been spent.

Critics, however, say the state should cut its losses and call it a day.
“The money is already wasted. There’s no way to unwaste it,” James Moore, director of the transportation engineering program at the University of Southern California, told Fox News.
He added that Californians have only “scratched the surface” when it comes to expenses, and said that estimates were “overtly deceptive.”
He described ridership forecasts as “fictional” and said the idea behind the state bullet train lacks logic.

“If you build a mode that is slower than an aircraft and costlier than gas, people aren’t going to ride it,” he said.
Kersey agrees.
“It’s far from certain that Californians would even utilize the proposed high-speed rail given the ease of air travel among California’s major cities,” he said. “It’s so easy to get in an airplane and fly anywhere you want to, (to) any of the big cities around the state.”
He also said that by the time the train is up and running – sometime around 2025 - it will be outdated.
“The ‘high-speed’ rail debacle is the technology of yesteryear and has no feasible plan for success,” he said, adding that Californians shouldn’t be forced to foot the bill for “pet projects for politicians.”
The four leading Democratic candidates for governor in California have offered various levels of support for the rail project.

The Los Angeles Times says current Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom -- the frontrunner in the gubernatorial race -- has dodged repeated requests for interviews on the bullet train for more than two years.
Newsom’s office also did not return multiple calls from Fox News seeking comment.
“This reticence to speak about a deeply troubled project might seem like smart political strategy, given its support by the governor and construction trade unions, a valued Democratic constituency,” The San Diego Union-Tribune wrote in a scathing editorial. “If the Democratic candidates don’t detail how they would salvage the most expensive public project in California history, there’s a better adjective: cowardly.”

Last February, California’s House asked the administration to block a pending federal grant until an audit of the project’s finances is completed.
The letter was signed by all 14 members of the state’s Republican delegation and was sent to Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao.
As of now, there's been no movement on the request.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/01/19/californias-bullet-train-and-biggest-boondoggle-overbudget-by-billions.html
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3125

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

California is great! Geographical speaking. It's the people that have screwed it up. I grew up in LA and then after college I stayed in Texas. Great people in Texas, but geographically speaking, no where near California.
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 4696

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
California is great! Geographical speaking. It's the people that have screwed it up. I grew up in LA and then after college I stayed in Texas. Great people in Texas, but geographically speaking, no where near California.


You do have SPI.
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 9110

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900, I have to ask, why is California so screwed up? That's a pretty big statement that needs some clarification. I hope that you can avoid the foolish right wing BS in the telling.
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wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 690

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

swchandler wrote:
techno900, I have to ask, why is California so screwed up? That's a pretty big statement that needs some clarification. I hope that you can avoid the foolish right wing BS in the telling.


I always say it's the cereal bowl of America. Nuts, fruits and flakes.
Stunning if you avoid the masses!
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 11038
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nw30 wrote:
Yes, Ca. is a brilliant state, a sanctuary state, illegals welcome, a state that has no concept of budgets, or even safety. What's next, serve a straw and go to jail?
This state, my home state, is an embarrassment.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

California's bullet train (and biggest boondoggle) is over budget by billions
1-19-18

It’s billions of dollars over budget and seven years behind schedule, and appears to have no plausible way of living up to its goal of getting riders across the state in three hours or less.
Welcome to what’s arguably the nation’s largest infrastructure project and California’s biggest boondoggle.
The highly hyped bullet train has been a challenge from the start. No one thought it would be technically, financially and politically easy, but the way the project has been mishandled has some Californians fed up and demanding answers.

Just this week, the California High-Speed Rail Authority, the organization charged with overseeing construction, reported that the cost of the first segment had dramatically risen – again.

“The worst-case scenario has happened,” admitted Roy Hill, lead consultant on the project.

Since its start, this hot-mess express of a project has been plagued by delays and has blown through every single budget estimate imaginable. And it’ll likely cost the state and taxpayers more in the coming months and years.
Much more.
“The so-called bullet train is a solution in search of a problem that is plagued by billions of dollars in cost overruns and fiscal mismanagement,” San Diego City Councilman Mark Kersey told Fox News. “The billions being wasted on this boondoggle could have been invested in our current infrastructure needs, such as water storage, flood control, highways and bridges.”
This week’s updated cost estimate -- to complete just the first phase - a 119-mile segment in the Central Valley - has ballooned to $10.6 billion. That’s a jaw-dropping 77 percent increase from initial estimates, 36 percent higher than forecasts from a year ago.
When California voters in 2008 narrowly approved $10 billion in bond as seed money for the high-speed rail development, they were told the total cost would be about $43 billion.
Fresh estimates put it now at $67 billion.

Brian Kelly, head of the State Transportation Agency, was appointed this week to run the High-Speed Rail Authority. He told The New York Times that even though the project has “mammoth opposition,” he has “never seen a single project that would have such a transformative impact as this one.”
Other supporters reason that the project should continue because billions of dollars have already been spent.

Critics, however, say the state should cut its losses and call it a day.
“The money is already wasted. There’s no way to unwaste it,” James Moore, director of the transportation engineering program at the University of Southern California, told Fox News.
He added that Californians have only “scratched the surface” when it comes to expenses, and said that estimates were “overtly deceptive.”
He described ridership forecasts as “fictional” and said the idea behind the state bullet train lacks logic.

“If you build a mode that is slower than an aircraft and costlier than gas, people aren’t going to ride it,” he said.
Kersey agrees.
“It’s far from certain that Californians would even utilize the proposed high-speed rail given the ease of air travel among California’s major cities,” he said. “It’s so easy to get in an airplane and fly anywhere you want to, (to) any of the big cities around the state.”
He also said that by the time the train is up and running – sometime around 2025 - it will be outdated.
“The ‘high-speed’ rail debacle is the technology of yesteryear and has no feasible plan for success,” he said, adding that Californians shouldn’t be forced to foot the bill for “pet projects for politicians.”
The four leading Democratic candidates for governor in California have offered various levels of support for the rail project.

The Los Angeles Times says current Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom -- the frontrunner in the gubernatorial race -- has dodged repeated requests for interviews on the bullet train for more than two years.
Newsom’s office also did not return multiple calls from Fox News seeking comment.
“This reticence to speak about a deeply troubled project might seem like smart political strategy, given its support by the governor and construction trade unions, a valued Democratic constituency,” The San Diego Union-Tribune wrote in a scathing editorial. “If the Democratic candidates don’t detail how they would salvage the most expensive public project in California history, there’s a better adjective: cowardly.”

Last February, California’s House asked the administration to block a pending federal grant until an audit of the project’s finances is completed.
The letter was signed by all 14 members of the state’s Republican delegation and was sent to Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao.
As of now, there's been no movement on the request.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2018/01/19/californias-bullet-train-and-biggest-boondoggle-overbudget-by-billions.html


I'm not a fan, the money would have been better spent for light rail in the cities. And I'm not completely convinced that the air corridor between the Bay Area and Socal has any capacity issues.

But with that said, conservatives reflexively oppose changed technology, and have starved California's infrastructure. Some of those proposals--highways, airports and supporting infrastructure, and ports and supporting infrastructure--have created massive wealth opportunities in the private sector. In the context of the California budget, spending on high speed rail is pretty small. The total spending for the State is over $100 billion. Of that, Transportation gets $20 billion. Half to Caltrans, and a measly $1 billion for high speed rail. 1%--but it sure gets Republicans panties in a twist. And Republicans have tried to block an increase in the gas tax--but couldn't get the signatures. One only needs to look at the near disaster at Oroville, and see that agency incompetence and the conservative idea of starving the beast could have killed thousands of people, maybe tens of thousands.

Next stop, global warming. Electing people that actually know something is overrated. eh?
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