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Bic techno 148
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d0uglass



Joined: 28 May 2004
Posts: 1240
Location: Bonita Springs, Florida

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Techno 2 is a great first shortboard and a good match for medium to large sized sails, like 6.0 - 9.0.

I had the techno 273 and 283, but I've ridden the Techno 2 and it's better all around than either of those predecessors.

Yes, the Techno 2 will plane a little earlier than the Kona. It will feel more light and lively when planing, but more slow and draggy when not planing. You'll probably still prefer the Kona in gusty or marginal conditions, but you'll be in heaven cruising in Hatteras with a 6.0 and a weed fin on the Techno 2.

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Jim.od3



Joined: 25 Aug 2012
Posts: 85

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many considerations here. My first reaction is the Techno 148 is not enough of a jump from your Kona to make it worthwhile. Anything you can learn on the Techno can also be learned on the Kona. A lot depends on how determined you are to progress in windsurfing, and how willing you are to acquire another board after the Techno. If you aspire to full-on planing in the footstraps and harness, and are willing to get a 3rd board, I think you would find the Techno a little easier to learn to plane than the Kona. It will give you a little more of the shortboard feel. But if you aren't interested in buying a 3rd board, I would skip the Techno, get as good as you can on the Kona (waterstarts, footstraps, harness), and then jump down to a significantly smaller board in the 100-125L range, depending on the conditions available where you sail. A board in the 100-125L range will be a big change from the Kona and open up a whole new range of fun.

That being said, the Techno is a good board by all accounts. I think you could have a lot of fun with it. I have owned three Bic boards, and I like them. I just bought an original Techno 130L for light wind on Lake Michigan. Have yet to take it out.
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NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 1186

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At his body weight and skill level it is a pretty good jump in board size. Besides that, the Techno is a full on freeride board different than the Kona.
Get a board to small for your local spot and your sure to get frustrated and the board will see little water time. A float-able, durable free ride board makes sense for his next step. Windsurfing is not the easiest sport to learn. Take it in small steps. Going from from a Kona to a board that is 100 to 125 liters is way to big of a step.
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swchandler



Joined: 08 Nov 1993
Posts: 9425

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2018 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let's not underestimate Xxwindsurfer. My first board was an F2 11"10" Strato, which I sailed for about 1 1/2 yrs, and then I bought a Seatrend 9'5" (est. 120liters). No problem my first day on the Seatrend at Lopez Lake, and I learned to waterstart both directions later the same day. It was that simple. That said, I admit to being well seasoned sailing the F2 at the time, but I never tried waterstarting before attempting on the Seatrend. Fast progress can happen, particularly if you are determined.

While I recognize that all folks aren't the same, I know transitioning isn't that difficult. How many seasons does someone need to go through to improve? No reason to go through protracted steps buying different boards of progressively smaller volumes. Why not step up to what the best folks at the beach are using?

I believe that the perfect quiver is three boards. A longboard, 100-115 shortboard, and finally a higher wind B&J. Of course, many would like to a waveboard too, but that just later down the line. With the 3 board quiver, you can handle everything.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3435

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also, no reason you can't learn to water start on your long board. Kick up the dagger so you can learn to position the board (nose about 30-40 degrees below a beam reach and give it a try. That's the way I learned on my first long board. When I got to my first transition board (an Atkin 911) no issue. That was in 1984/85.
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Jim.od3



Joined: 25 Aug 2012
Posts: 85

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Either path is feasible: progressively move down in board size in 2 or 3 steps improving your skills along the way, or work hard at getting proficient at waterstart/footstraps/harness on a longboard and jump down to the board size that is optimal for your location.

A lot depends on Xxwindsurfer's goals, budget, innate ability, etc.

Many paths to success, but no royal road.
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Xxwindsurfer



Joined: 17 Feb 2015
Posts: 45

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I appreciate the comments.

I am not interested in any board under 125, at my age and skill level as well as with my usual wind conditions, that would be unnecessary.
150 range seems to be about right I think.

I donít want to spend my $ unless I would have a significant improvement in my enjoyment level, manifest as more fun and possibly less effort while sailing in planing winds on a 5.5-7.5 sail range. ( It seems like drag with my Kona might be holding me back )

If that is the case, the likely cost is not a concern
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NOVAAN



Joined: 28 Sep 1994
Posts: 1186

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Windsurfing offers a wide spectrum of "fun" Only you can define what your fun is. The Kona has great lite wind glide that once powered up will plane and go fairly fast. The Techno, once powered up will be faster, ride the fin for a lite free feeling ride and turn much better. Is that worth the $. For me yes.
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grantmac017



Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 791

PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 12:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In real sub-6.0 conditions I think that Bic would be a handful. Get waterstarts figured out with the Kona then go for something you can just barely uphaul.
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alap



Joined: 17 Dec 2007
Posts: 140

PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xxwindsurfer wrote:

I am not interested in any board under 125,
150 range seems to be about right I think.

in planing winds on a 5.5-7.5 sail range.


your numbers contradict themself
this 148 l board is too much for 7.0... best sail for it is 8.0-8.5 (talking only about planning)
certainly will be much better than Kona though

if you want ideal board for 6.0 go with 100...105 liters.
you will be able to use it with 7.0 too, but 7.5 will be too much for it.

if money not an issue go with this 148 liter for your biggest sail but also buy 100..105

don't be surprised that you will need something 110..115 dedicated to 7.0 in a while

as for learning - it is much easier to learn on a proper board size matched with proper rig for the wind. Of course if there is not enough wind on too small a board/sail it is difficult to learn waterstart; it is a bit easier to learn it in too much wind on a too big board, but still learning is best done with ideal match - when you already know the trick you can adjust the mismatch between equipment and conditions, but not while learning.

what I am trying to say is that first match the board with sail, i.e. don't try sailing 7.5 on 100 liters or 6.5 on 148. Secondly when learning skills this proper set should be matched with a proper wind.
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