myiW Current Conditions and Forecasts Community Forums Buy and Sell Services
 
Hi guest · myAccount · Log in
 SearchSearch   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   RegisterRegister 
Nutty California
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 65, 66, 67  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Politics, Off-Topic, Opinions
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
wsurfer



Joined: 17 Aug 2000
Posts: 690

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mat-ty wrote:
LHDR wrote:
techno900 wrote:
This is the bike path that runs from the Garden Grove freeway to Angel Stadium.

https://youtu.be/hIGuSNf29U8 This runs for 8 minutes - amazing. I wonder how many of these folks are "undocumented immigrants?

Sure, techno, since it's CA these people must be evil, undocumented immigrants, right?

Have you thought about the possibility that they could also be homeless veterans?

"According to the VA in 2011, veterans made up 14% of homeless adult males, and 2% of homeless adult females, and both groups were overrepresented within the homeless population compared to the general population. The overall count in 2012 showed 62,619 homeless veterans in the United States. In January 2013, there were an estimated 57,849 homeless veterans in the U.S., or 12% of the homeless population. Just under 8% were female. In July 2014, the largest population of homeless veterans lived in Los Angeles County, with there being over 6,000 homeless veterans, out of the total estimated 54,000 homeless within that area."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeless_veterans_in_the_United_States

But no, that wouldn't fit neatly into your picture of California and homelessness in general, would it? Must be illegals, must be bad people? Sorry, techno, but I find your post rather upsetting.



Just think, If we got control of our borders and if Liberals would stop rewarding Illegals for breaking our laws, WE COULD HAVE ZERO HOMELESS VETS!!


Show me how to do that and I'll show you a perfect world Exclamation Exclamation Exclamation
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
real-human



Joined: 02 Jul 2011
Posts: 10835
Location: on earth

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 5:06 am    Post subject: Re: Nutty California Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
Interesting contrast as to how Calif. sets priorities:

CA tax dollars are going down a black hole. To put the cost in perspective:

With a potential cost of $98 billion for California's Bullet Train and a population of 39.5 million people equates to cost of almost $2,500 for every man, woman and child in the state.

https://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/californias-bullet-train-to-fiscal-oblivion/

Then there is:

This is the bike path that runs from the Garden Grove freeway to Angel Stadium.

https://youtu.be/hIGuSNf29U8 This runs for 8 minutes - amazing. I wonder how many of these folks are "undocumented immigrants?


Is that like the star wars reagun wasted money in that still to this day we can not shoot down a missile to defend ourselves.... the largest expenditure of money for a single issue in the history of the USA and not one single missle to this date can be shot down in space.


https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/05/the-first-long-distance-telegraph-message-sent-this-day-in-1844-what-hath-god-wrought/276226/

Did you know that Congress wasted probably in today's equivalents a grant to was it, Morse, to put a telegraph from Washington dc to Baltimore that would only help a very few americans know the results of an election faster? Gee it only started the communications industry for the USA and world.

https://eh.net/encyclopedia/history-of-the-u-s-telegraph-industry/


Quote:
He obtained a $30,000 grant from Congress in 1843 to build an experimental line between Baltimore and Washington.


A huge percentage of the homeless that you are attacking are mentally ill. How co-incidental that you point out the homeless in california when Reygun dismantled the mental health system of california.

Is it the mental ills fault they are homeless? Are you like Hitler and so on and want them in death camps? To be gassed for being mentally ill. Again your partys hero dismantled mental heath care for them ill. And threw them on the streets.

Californias levy and water system was built how? Did you say by your standard illegal immigrants from was it China. The railroads in the USA were built by who? Did you say by your standards illegal?

_________________
when good people stay silent the right wing are the only ones heard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3465

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And they kicked off this boondoggle using $3.3 billion in federal stimulus funds and $2.7 billion in state bond money. So, California has their hand in my pockets too for their nutty development. They kicked this thing off prematurely because they didn't want to miss out on the federal funding.

Quote:
Will Unfinished Train Overpasses Become California’s Stonehenge?
By Victor Davis Hanson

January 25, 2018 5:00 AM

The misbegotten project, now stalling, should never have been started.

Nobody quite knows who built Stonehenge some 5,000 years ago in southern England. The mysterious ring of huge stone monoliths stands mute.

Californians may leave behind similarly enigmatic monuments for puzzled future generations. Along a 119-mile pathway in central California, from Bakersfield to Madera, there are now huge, quarter-finished concrete overpasses. These are the totems of the initial segment of a planned high-speed-rail corridor.

Californians thought high-speed rail was a great idea when they voted for it in 2008. The state is overwhelmingly progressive. Silicon Valley reflects California’s confidence in new-age technology. Californians are among the highest-taxed citizens in the nation. They apparently are not opposed to borrowing and spending for ambitious government projects — especially to alleviate crowded freeways.

Planners assured voters that the cost for the first 520 miles was going to be an “affordable” $33 billion. The rail line seemed a good way to connect the state’s economically depressed interior with the affluent coastal corridor.

The segment from Madera to Bakersfield was thought to be the easiest to build. Rural land was cheaper to acquire in the interior of California. The route was flat, without the need to bore tunnels. The valley is considered seismically stable. Economically depressed counties welcomed the state and federal investment dollars.

But projected costs have soared even before one foot of track has been laid. The entire project’s estimated price, according to various projections, may have nearly doubled. The current cost for the easiest first segment alone has spiraled from a promised $7.8 billion in 2016 to an estimated $10.6 billion. There is no assurance that enough Central Valley riders will wish to use the line.

The real problem is that this environmentally friendly mass-transportation project is being undertaken in a state known for high taxes, litigiousness, chronic budget crises, Byzantine regulations, a dysfunctional one-party political system, and challenging geography.

Will the federal government bail out California high-speed rail? So far, the Trump administration has shown no real affinity for blue-state California in general, or for the idea of subsidizing mass transit in particular.

Can California find its own money? Maybe not. The state has been on a spending spree driven by social-welfare and health-care and pension costs. The state budget has ballooned by 44 percent over the past seven years to an inconceivable $190 billion when all annual costs (including bond spending and special funds) are added up.

More worrisome, new federal tax codes allow only $10,000 in state-and-local-tax deductions on individual returns. Given California’s exorbitant taxes and property assessments, high-end earners will soon learn that what they owe the IRS has skyrocketed.

How will the state raise taxes even higher when only about 150,000 households out of 40 million state residents already pay almost half the state’s income tax? Given the proximity of several low- and no-tax states, thousands of affluent retirees might move once they see the effects of losing federal tax deductions.

California imposed new taxes on gasoline and licenses to raise $5.2 billion in order to fix decrepit roads — which in some sense had been shorted by the decision to spend billions on high-speed rail. Some surveys rate the state’s once-cutting-edge freeways among the worst in the country. There is not much of a fallback tax base. California has the nation’s highest percentage of impoverished residents after factoring in cost of living. One in three welfare recipients in the U.S. lives in the state. One in four California residents was not born in the United States.

California governor Jerry Brown just warned that in the foreseeable future it may be impossible to honor pension obligations to the state’s retirees. They may already be underfunded by nearly half a trillion dollars. California’s once-impressive annualized GDP is slowing. Despite the tech boom and the national economic renaissance, the state has recently slipped from fifth in the U.S. to 35th in annual economic growth.

In the foreseeable future it may be impossible to honor pension obligations to the state’s retirees. They may already be underfunded by nearly half a trillion dollars.


https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/01/high-speed-rail-california-boondoggles/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jpbassman



Joined: 19 May 1998
Posts: 3321
Location: Leo

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Idiot, the liberals for years have been in favor of a free national ID with biometrics." liberals have been screaming that requiring an ID to vote is discriminatory. Dean you are a liar.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 12840
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More crazy wing nut postings than usual. I am not a fan of high speed rail—I think the money would have been better spent in cities for light rail which have greater ridership. But it sure seems to light up conservatives, who don’t seem to notice greater waste in military programs. JPbassman’s comment is just plain misinformed and whacky.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LHDR



Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 439

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jpbassman wrote:
"Idiot, the liberals for years have been in favor of a free national ID with biometrics."

Liberals have been screaming that requiring an ID to vote is discriminatory. Dean you are a liar.

JP, you should try to inform yourself before calling someone a liar, even if you dislike that person, I think. Voter ID laws can be discriminatory and liberals can support voter photo IDs at the same time. This is from a liberal, Jimmy Carter, and James Baker.

"In 2005, we led a bipartisan Commission on Federal Election Reform and concluded that both parties' concerns were legitimate - a free and fair election requires both ballot security and full access to voting. We offered a proposal to bridge the partisan divide by suggesting a uniform voter photo ID, based on the federal Real ID Act of 2005, to be phased in over five years. To help with the transition, states would provide free voter photo ID cards for eligible citizens; mobile units would be sent out to provide the IDs and register voters." http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/03/opinion/03carter.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5852
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LHDR wrote:
jpbassman wrote:
"Idiot, the liberals for years have been in favor of a free national ID with biometrics."

Liberals have been screaming that requiring an ID to vote is discriminatory. Dean you are a liar.

JP, you should try to inform yourself before calling someone a liar, even if you dislike that person, I think. Voter ID laws can be discriminatory and liberals can support voter photo IDs at the same time. This is from a liberal, Jimmy Carter, and James Baker.

"In 2005, we led a bipartisan Commission on Federal Election Reform and concluded that both parties' concerns were legitimate - a free and fair election requires both ballot security and full access to voting. We offered a proposal to bridge the partisan divide by suggesting a uniform voter photo ID, based on the federal Real ID Act of 2005, to be phased in over five years. To help with the transition, states would provide free voter photo ID cards for eligible citizens; mobile units would be sent out to provide the IDs and register voters." http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/03/opinion/03carter.html

Beings that this was written in 2008, I doubt that the highlighted line still applies to California.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3465

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac said:
Quote:
More crazy wing nut postings than usual. I am not a fan of high speed rail—I think the money would have been better spent in cities for light rail which have greater ridership. But it sure seems to light up conservatives, who don’t seem to notice greater waste in military programs.

I wonder if you voted for or against the high speed rail at the time? There's plenty of government waste, but I am just pointing out how a liberal controlled state sets its priorities and wastes our money.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 6407

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wsurfer wrote:
mat-ty wrote:
LHDR wrote:
techno900 wrote:
This is the bike path that runs from the Garden Grove freeway to Angel Stadium.

https://youtu.be/hIGuSNf29U8 This runs for 8 minutes - amazing. I wonder how many of these folks are "undocumented immigrants?

Sure, techno, since it's CA these people must be evil, undocumented immigrants, right?

Have you thought about the possibility that they could also be homeless veterans?

"According to the VA in 2011, veterans made up 14% of homeless adult males, and 2% of homeless adult females, and both groups were overrepresented within the homeless population compared to the general population. The overall count in 2012 showed 62,619 homeless veterans in the United States. In January 2013, there were an estimated 57,849 homeless veterans in the U.S., or 12% of the homeless population. Just under 8% were female. In July 2014, the largest population of homeless veterans lived in Los Angeles County, with there being over 6,000 homeless veterans, out of the total estimated 54,000 homeless within that area."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeless_veterans_in_the_United_States

But no, that wouldn't fit neatly into your picture of California and homelessness in general, would it? Must be illegals, must be bad people? Sorry, techno, but I find your post rather upsetting.



Just think, If we got control of our borders and if Liberals would stop rewarding Illegals for breaking our laws, WE COULD HAVE ZERO HOMELESS VETS!!


Show me how to do that and I'll show you a perfect world Exclamation Exclamation Exclamation



Doing so would be as simple as getting liberals to obey the law....Guess what? It is illegal to be illegal
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 5852
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been to both places, and this is sooooooooo true!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Seeing San Francisco through new eyes after trip to tidy D.C.
By Carl Nolte
March 9, 2018 Updated: March 12, 2018 10:47am

It was the last leg of a long flight from Washington, D.C., and on the final approach to SFO, San Francisco glittered in the light of a March day. It’s beautiful from the air. But coming back to San Francisco after a few days in another city is always a bit of a shock.
You look at the city with fresh eyes, and it’s a jolt. Coming into downtown San Francisco you realize that the heart of the city is dirty; there is trash everywhere, and beggars, too.

You notice the windows on the BART train look like they haven’t been washed since Obama was president. The escalator at the Powell Station is out of order. It was broken when you left town, and it’s been broken for at least a month. You have to hoof it up the long stairway, and once on the street you notice homeless men just hanging around. There’s a guy sprawled sleeping in the bus stop at Fifth and Mission streets. People have to step around him to get on the bus.
It’s remarkable how the 1874 Old Mint resembles federal buildings of the same vintage in Washington. But the Mission Street side of San Francisco’s Old Mint has graffiti scrawled on it; it’s been there for two months. You don’t see that in Washington.

We were in the nation’s capital because my companion, the Sailor Girl, went to a conference. I tagged along to keep her company.
A trip to Washington is always an education. It’s a beautiful city, laid out to show the power and glory of the United States. We wandered around like tourists: saw the Lincoln Memorial, walked the great National Mall, peeked over the fence at the White House, poked around in Georgetown, had a drink and dinner at the Old Ebbitt Grill, Washington’s oldest saloon.

You are reminded of the government every day: the flags, the solemn buildings, the memorials. We talked to a man from Kentucky at the Vietnam War Memorial. He was there, he said, to honor his cousin, who was 19 years old when he was killed in a minefield back in 1975. He would have been nearing retirement age now.

There was a great commotion one evening on Dupont Circle — sirens, motorcycle cops, flashing red and blue lights, a phalanx of Secret Service cars, a black limousine flying a flag followed by more security, even an ambulance. A great man passing by like an emperor.
A big storm brushed by the city when we were there. Winds so strong planes couldn’t land at National Airport just across the Potomac. An old tree planted in Andrew Jackson’s time toppled over and wrecked a parked car. There was a snow flurry, and end-of-winter cold. Schoolkids wore big coats, like little bears.
Washington is in chaos, in the news anyway. It’s on television and in the papers, so it must be true. High officials are quitting, the administration is a mess. But the chaos must all be inside those impressive government buildings. On the outside, the city looks good. Despite the storm, the streets were clean; the fallen branches were taken away the next day. The trash bins and news racks that were blown over by the wind were quickly put right. Life went on.

I rode the Washington Metro subway a bit, too. In my salad days I used to cover BART for the newspaper, so I knew the Washington system was similar. The Metro had big mechanical and safety problems a couple of years ago. The problems were hard to see last week. The stations were clean, and so were the cars. The passengers didn’t put their feet on the seats, and I didn’t see any sleeping derelicts on the train or in the stations. The escalators all ran.

But Washington can be a tough place, too. I remember being in the wrong part of town a few years ago. A man came up to me. “Pardon me,” he said, “but you don’t belong here.” He gave me a hard look. “You should leave.” And I did.

There are panhandlers in Washington, but not many. And if there were crazy people, they were not out on the streets, screaming.
They were giving out free food the other afternoon in downtown Washington to people down on their luck. They had a line, like a cafeteria, free dinner on cardboard trays.
The customers stood by the side eating the free food, and when they were finished put the trays and the empty milk cartons in trash cans.
That was the big difference. In San Francisco, they would have thrown the garbage in the street. People treat the streets in San Francisco as if the place was a dump. Because it is.

I was puzzled by all this. How could this city work so well, while San Francisco, which is so rich and so pleased with itself, be such a mess? I asked around. “It’s the culture,” people said. “We don’t act the way you say they do in San Francisco. It’s not done.”
Maybe they take pride in their city.

https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/nativeson/article/Seeing-San-Francisco-through-new-eyes-after-trip-12742866.php
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    iWindsurf Community Forum Index -> Politics, Off-Topic, Opinions All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 65, 66, 67  Next
Page 2 of 67

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum

myiW | Weather | Community | Membership | Support | Log in
like us on facebook
© Copyright 1999-2007 WeatherFlow, Inc Contact Us Ad Marketplace

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group