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Nutty California
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 8564
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cgoudie1 wrote:
I live in Cottonwood Heights. Politics be dammed. ;*)

I have to relate a quick story from my semi-youth though. Back in the
early 80s the Wife and I and our 2 babies were touring Californiia in an old pop-top Volkswagen bus (you know the rounded version). We were parked
(and camped) somewhere on the San Diego bay and I was laying on the
bed with the back hatch open to the water with the warm breeze blowing through the vehicle as the sun was going down with my kids at arm. I
remember thinking life didn't get much better, and maybe I could live there.

California, it might be nutty, but it's also pretty nice.

-Craig


boggsman1 wrote:
Correct...Tahoe drives can be a nightmare. To the point that I'd consider moving. I've considered Cottonwood Heights, UT...but I couldn't handle the politics. Colorado is a candidate too, but my wife cant hack the winters. Oregon is a candidate but the skiing is lame, and winters are depressing. So, I deal with the traffic, and frenetic d-bag lift lines. Covid has cleaned out the traffic a lot, and I hope work-from -home makes its more permanent..




Good stuff Craig. One of my college buddies moved to Park City in 1989, now he lives in Cottonwood Heights. I love it there. I can grab a quick flight from SF, stay in the Hampton Inn, and its almost easier than driving to my condo in Squaw.
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coboardhead



Joined: 26 Oct 2009
Posts: 4034

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
I will be in Telluride tomorrow for a week of skiing. Never a lift line more than a couple of minutes and most of the time, no lines. Few if any day trippers there. This year with limited lift tickets = never a wait for a lift.

I have skied Calif (8 areas), BC (1), Utah (5), Colorado (15), Vermont (2), West Virginia (1), New Mexico (1) and NC (2). Telluride is one of the best, but I am not off-piste anymore. I started at Mt. Baldy in Calif. in 1960 - wood skis, cable bindings, and hiking boots and a $4.50 student lift ticket.


About to jump on the chair at Tride. Skiing went from pretty bad to excellent in the last 10 days. Even Gold Hill is filled in enough to ski (if you know where the rock bands are). Have fun!
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coboardhead



Joined: 26 Oct 2009
Posts: 4034

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cgoudie1 wrote:
I live in Cottonwood Heights. Politics be dammed. ;*)

I have to relate a quick story from my semi-youth though. Back in the
early 80s the Wife and I and our 2 babies were touring Californiia in an old pop-top Volkswagen bus (you know the rounded version). We were parked
(and camped) somewhere on the San Diego bay and I was laying on the
bed with the back hatch open to the water with the warm breeze blowing through the vehicle as the sun was going down with my kids at arm. I
remember thinking life didn't get much better, and maybe I could live there.

California, it might be nutty, but it's also pretty nice.

-Craig

I used to ski out of Bishop over Memorial Day. Ski packing in the Sierra in the summer sun has to be one of my top memories. Wouldn’t see a soul in three days. I wonder if it is still like that!


boggsman1 wrote:
Correct...Tahoe drives can be a nightmare. To the point that I'd consider moving. I've considered Cottonwood Heights, UT...but I couldn't handle the politics. Colorado is a candidate too, but my wife cant hack the winters. Oregon is a candidate but the skiing is lame, and winters are depressing. So, I deal with the traffic, and frenetic d-bag lift lines. Covid has cleaned out the traffic a lot, and I hope work-from -home makes its more permanent..
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3900

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

coboardhead wrote:
techno900 wrote:
I will be in Telluride tomorrow for a week of skiing. Never a lift line more than a couple of minutes and most of the time, no lines. Few if any day trippers there. This year with limited lift tickets = never a wait for a lift.

I have skied Calif (8 areas), BC (1), Utah (5), Colorado (15), Vermont (2), West Virginia (1), New Mexico (1) and NC (2). Telluride is one of the best, but I am not off-piste anymore. I started at Mt. Baldy in Calif. in 1960 - wood skis, cable bindings, and hiking boots and a $4.50 student lift ticket.


About to jump on the chair at Tride. Skiing went from pretty bad to excellent in the last 10 days. Even Gold Hill is filled in enough to ski (if you know where the rock bands are). Have fun!


62 inch base with a little under 3' of new snow in the last week. Base amount is normal or a bit above for this time of the year (from past experience).
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J64TWB



Joined: 24 Dec 2013
Posts: 1539

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Has the air pollution improved in Salt Lake or is there still a carbon haze inversion that can block views? That stuff is nasty.
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cgoudie1



Joined: 10 Apr 2006
Posts: 2381
Location: Killer Sturgeon Cove

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't seen it much this year, but anytime there's an inversion for
many days it can definitely get nasty. Climate change seems to
have mitigated the nastiness this year, but it has only recently gotten
good and snowy.

-Craig

p.s. if you live in Cottonwood Heights, you're kind of above the inversion.
Sweeeeet!

J64TWB wrote:
Has the air pollution improved in Salt Lake or is there still a carbon haze inversion that can block views? That stuff is nasty.
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isobars



Joined: 12 Dec 1999
Posts: 20106

PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I lived between Ogden and SLC (1976-1983), the inversion fogs were incredible. The suicide rates went up significantly, we were told. That's particularly sad (no pun intended) when all one has to do to find clear blue skies and a wide variety of world-class recreation is drive a little ways east into the mountains or south into the desert.

In case it isn't obvious, I really miss most aspects of Utah.

cgoudie1 wrote:
I haven't seen it much this year, but anytime there's an inversion for many days it can definitely get nasty.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3900

PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2021 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

boggsman1 wrote:
techno900 wrote:
I will be in Telluride tomorrow for a week of skiing. Never a lift line more than a couple of minutes and most of the time, no lines. Few if any day trippers there. This year with limited lift tickets = never a wait for a lift.

I have skied Calif (8 areas), BC (1), Utah (5), Colorado (15), Vermont (2), West Virginia (1), New Mexico (1) and NC (2). Telluride is one of the best, but I am not off-piste anymore. I started at Mt. Baldy in Calif. in 1960 - wood skis, cable bindings, and hiking boots and a $4.50 student lift ticket.


Enjoy! But lift lines all over the West are bigger than they have ever been. IKON passes have sold out all Western ski areas, and it seems everyone is skiing this winter. And, all lifts are operating around 50% chair capacity ..


Home yesterday. Five days of wonderful conditions. Four days of 100% sun and the last day with sun and clouds. Temps nice. The first day on Sunday, lift lines averaged 10 minutes, then the rest of the week, 0-5 minutes depending on the lift.
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 8564
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2021 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
boggsman1 wrote:
techno900 wrote:
I will be in Telluride tomorrow for a week of skiing. Never a lift line more than a couple of minutes and most of the time, no lines. Few if any day trippers there. This year with limited lift tickets = never a wait for a lift.

I have skied Calif (8 areas), BC (1), Utah (5), Colorado (15), Vermont (2), West Virginia (1), New Mexico (1) and NC (2). Telluride is one of the best, but I am not off-piste anymore. I started at Mt. Baldy in Calif. in 1960 - wood skis, cable bindings, and hiking boots and a $4.50 student lift ticket.


Enjoy! But lift lines all over the West are bigger than they have ever been. IKON passes have sold out all Western ski areas, and it seems everyone is skiing this winter. And, all lifts are operating around 50% chair capacity ..


Home yesterday. Five days of wonderful conditions. Four days of 100% sun and the last day with sun and clouds. Temps nice. The first day on Sunday, lift lines averaged 10 minutes, then the rest of the week, 0-5 minutes depending on the lift.


Good Stuff... I just got back from Big Sky...fantastic skiing there. Even got a chance to ski at the Yellowstone Club which is an off the hook experience.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16179
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2021 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mrgybe wrote:
boggsman1 wrote:
You are a slippery character. I never said you were wrong to assert that children are being abused

You are correct, rather you gave the wholesale opinion that that my positions are "wrong", and have been for 10 years. When asked to be specific, you declined to answer. Given that the human rights abuses have been central to my arguments, I can only conclude that you just don't care.

boggsman1 wrote:
Secondly, the EPA has found that fracking impacts drinking water, only an apologist would deny that, the shoe seems to fit there.

More superficial knowledge. Extensive EPA studies up to 2015 found that there is no widespread contamination of drinking water from fracking. In the waning hours of the Obama Administration, they added words to their reports which indicated that such contamination "can" occur in certain circumstances. Of course it "can" happen, just like any accident "can" happen. The evidence is clear, despite the huge scale of the fracking
activity, it has not happened in anything other than isolated incidents.

Finally, to help those who think that asking serious questions about EVs must indicate a rabid defense of the evil oil and gas business, please try to think a little. If there is mass adoption of EVs, who will be powering those vehicles? That's it, think, think, you can do it..........you got it! The oil and gas industry in hugely increased supplies to gas fired power plants.


Of course this would more appropriately be discussed under climate change or the oil industry. But the claim here that fracking is good is so spun—“no widespread contamination” that it bears a little examination.

First, as I pointed out long ago, Dick Cheney’s private meetings with energy executives while he was VP led to a broad de-regulation of fracking—outside the normal transparency requirements of most regulation. The ironic good news is that the boost it gave natural gas has essentially killed coal. While the CO2 signature of natural gas is far better than that of coal, when methane emissions are considered, it is not clear that the net result was beneficial.

But the more important damage was to public trust in institutions. The abusive use of his power by Cheney raised suspicion about fracking. Dismissing the problems that have been documented as “isolated” doesn’t help. Nor did the efforts of the Trumpian oil folks who prevented any serious consideration of the methane emissions associated with natural gas production. When the public doesn’t trust the regulatory system, they turn to the courts. That may be good for lawyers, pr flacks and lobbyists but is neither efficient nor entirely rational.

The New Yorker has an on-line article about fracking in Pennsylvania that discusses concerns about a cluster of Ewing’s sarcoma cases. https://www.newyorker.com/news/dispatch/when-the-kids-started-getting-sick?utm_source=nl&utm_brand=tny&utm_mailing=TNY_Daily_030221&utm_campaign=aud-dev&utm_medium=email&bxid=5dfabdf7fc942d641a20c2e1&cndid=28886814&hasha=50a49ee4eeff8b7d418ff57d217d3beb&hashb=6f5d489012732b7aa770fb5e3828f8210cbb7ba1&hashc=9b48f2f27b5765b8fae61887f02d334ccc060921a4938a43449259568394713d&esrc=bounceX&utm_term=TNY_Daily

It’s pretty balanced, and makes it clear that cancer clusters that have been studied extensively are usually just the result of randomness. But dismissing those concerns, while pressing deregulation that damage trust and increase shady activities is certainly a practice that can’t look good when scrutinized.
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