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Nutty California
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 6921

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nw30 wrote:
boggsman1 wrote:
nw30 wrote:
It's tough to tell if she's from L.A. or the bay area, both places share the same fashion.


NW...I'd say Central Coast, maybe Pismo, or Cambria. I saw a few like her in Cambria, when I swung through last July....

BTW- Is Arroya Laguna the choice piece of sand you past a couple miles before the Elephant Seal lookout?
A bit late in seeing this (obviously), the answer is yep. A pic of me and my buddy Bruce about 6 weeks ago on a light day. And a pic of me, that I just saw on this site a few days ago, taken by Kevin Kan about a month ago. Funny thing though, I don't think I've ever met Kevin, and I don't think he's ever met me, but I could be wrong, I meet lots of other w'surfers & kiters there.


looks nice!!!! nothing better than an empty beach..
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3524

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe not as peachy in Calif. as Mac claims.

Quote:
No, California's Finances Are Not Back In Black

Patrick Gleason

It’s happening again. People who should know better are pointing to California’s current budget surplus as proof that the state, the world’s fifth largest economy, is in sound financial shape. That figure is also being used to support the claim that California’s relatively high tax burden and onerous regulations are not too problematic, as CNBC’s Robert Frank did on Squawk Box the morning after Tax Day.

The surplus figure cited by Frank and others has two problems: it’s both misleading and paints an incomplete picture of the Golden State’s finances. The truth is that there is no revenue surplus had by California state government. In fact, the state’s long-run obligations far exceed projected revenue collections to the tune of $1 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities alone. When factoring in the cost of non-pension benefits for state workers, such as health care for retired government employees, the debt facing California taxpayers rises further.

“Combining California’s debt with publicly held federal debt, we estimate a total debt-to-GDP ratio of 125% (or 153% using the broader definition of federal debt),” California Policy Center report released in 2017 points out. “This level places California distressingly close to peripheral Eurozone countries that faced financial crises in 2011 and 2012. Portugal’s 2015 debt-to-GDP ratio was 129% and Italy’s was 133%.”

Bill Fletcher and Marc Joffe, authors of the California Policy Center report, breakdown how much of this debt each Californian is on the hook for and find a burden of “$33,000 per resident and $74,000 per taxpayer – excluding their share of federal debt.”

This massive unfunded pension liability, which California taxpayers are on the hook for, is something that state legislators in Sacramento continue to ignore, acting as though the problem will go away on its own (or, more likely, that the federal government will bail them out at the end of the day).

State and local unfunded pension liabilities are pegged at $5 trillion nationwide, with California accounting for about a fifth of that total. States where unfunded pension liabilities are the worst (states like Illinois, New York, and California) are the places where there is the least amount of political will and interest in addressing the issue.

That’s not the only canary in the California coal mine. Years of domestic net outmigration is further proof that all is not well in the Golden State. In the five years from 2011 to 2016, the most recent half decade for which IRS migration data is available, California had a net loss of more than 243,000 people, with an annual income in excess of $7.7 billion, to other states.

California Is Losing People To The “Mean” States

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced earlier this month that California state employee travel and state sponsored travel to anywhere in South Carolina is now banned. No, this prohibition is not due to the recent announcement that the Hominy Grill is closing. Instead the impetus for the travel ban is a recently-enacted South Carolina law that Becerra deems to be “discriminatory.” The law in question protects faith-based institutions and non-profits from being coerced into taking actions that violate their religious beliefs.

With this move, South Carolina becomes the 10th state to which California has banned state employee and state sponsored travel. Others states on California’s travel ban list include Tennessee, Texas, South Dakota, Oklahoma, North Carolina, Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama, and Kansas.
“The state of California stands strongly against any form of discrimination. (State law) AB 1887 authorizes my office to make that promise real,” California Attorney General Becerra said. “California will now bar state-funded or sponsored travel to South Carolina.”

As it would happen, Californians themselves have been pulling up stakes and moving their families to the very states that Attorney General Becerra has deemed so mean and offensive to California sensibilities that government workers and public university athletes cannot be allowed to travel to them.
Over the past five years, California has lost 2,641 people to South Carolina, who took more than $172 million in annual income with them to the Palmetto State. During that half decade, California experienced a net loss of more than 121,000 people to the ten states to which Becerra and company have banned travel. These ex-Californians brought more than $4 billion in annual income to those states included in the California travel ban.

Instead of spending time issuing more travel bans, a move that serves to both inconvenience student-athletes and heighten American political division, Attorney General Becerra and other California officials might want to reflect on the fact that they’re losing population to states they deem to be “backward” and why that might be happening.

California law is no longer open to letting state workers and public university athletes travel to ten states, including one that is the world’s 10th largest economy (Texas). Yet those ten states are welcoming tens of thousands of ex-Californians with open arms, lower tax rates, and public officials not focused on North Korea-style travel bans.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/patrickgleason/2019/04/16/no-californias-finances-are-not-back-in-black/#971bd9037b5e
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 7673
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nw30 wrote:
boggsman1 wrote:
nw30 wrote:
It's tough to tell if she's from L.A. or the bay area, both places share the same fashion.


NW...I'd say Central Coast, maybe Pismo, or Cambria. I saw a few like her in Cambria, when I swung through last July....

BTW- Is Arroya Laguna the choice piece of sand you past a couple miles before the Elephant Seal lookout?
A bit late in seeing this (obviously), the answer is yep. A pic of me and my buddy Bruce about 6 weeks ago on a light day. And a pic of me, that I just saw on this site a few days ago, taken by Kevin Kan about a month ago. Funny thing though, I don't think I've ever met Kevin, and I don't think he's ever met me, but I could be wrong, I meet lots of other w'surfers & kiters there.


Awesome!!!
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 7673
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

techno900 wrote:
Maybe not as peachy in Calif. as Mac claims.

Quote:
No, California's Finances Are Not Back In Black

Patrick Gleason

It’s happening again. People who should know better are pointing to California’s current budget surplus as proof that the state, the world’s fifth largest economy, is in sound financial shape. That figure is also being used to support the claim that California’s relatively high tax burden and onerous regulations are not too problematic, as CNBC’s Robert Frank did on Squawk Box the morning after Tax Day.

The surplus figure cited by Frank and others has two problems: it’s both misleading and paints an incomplete picture of the Golden State’s finances. The truth is that there is no revenue surplus had by California state government. In fact, the state’s long-run obligations far exceed projected revenue collections to the tune of $1 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities alone. When factoring in the cost of non-pension benefits for state workers, such as health care for retired government employees, the debt facing California taxpayers rises further.

“Combining California’s debt with publicly held federal debt, we estimate a total debt-to-GDP ratio of 125% (or 153% using the broader definition of federal debt),” California Policy Center report released in 2017 points out. “This level places California distressingly close to peripheral Eurozone countries that faced financial crises in 2011 and 2012. Portugal’s 2015 debt-to-GDP ratio was 129% and Italy’s was 133%.”

Bill Fletcher and Marc Joffe, authors of the California Policy Center report, breakdown how much of this debt each Californian is on the hook for and find a burden of “$33,000 per resident and $74,000 per taxpayer – excluding their share of federal debt.”

This massive unfunded pension liability, which California taxpayers are on the hook for, is something that state legislators in Sacramento continue to ignore, acting as though the problem will go away on its own (or, more likely, that the federal government will bail them out at the end of the day).

State and local unfunded pension liabilities are pegged at $5 trillion nationwide, with California accounting for about a fifth of that total. States where unfunded pension liabilities are the worst (states like Illinois, New York, and California) are the places where there is the least amount of political will and interest in addressing the issue.

That’s not the only canary in the California coal mine. Years of domestic net outmigration is further proof that all is not well in the Golden State. In the five years from 2011 to 2016, the most recent half decade for which IRS migration data is available, California had a net loss of more than 243,000 people, with an annual income in excess of $7.7 billion, to other states.

California Is Losing People To The “Mean” States

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced earlier this month that California state employee travel and state sponsored travel to anywhere in South Carolina is now banned. No, this prohibition is not due to the recent announcement that the Hominy Grill is closing. Instead the impetus for the travel ban is a recently-enacted South Carolina law that Becerra deems to be “discriminatory.” The law in question protects faith-based institutions and non-profits from being coerced into taking actions that violate their religious beliefs.

With this move, South Carolina becomes the 10th state to which California has banned state employee and state sponsored travel. Others states on California’s travel ban list include Tennessee, Texas, South Dakota, Oklahoma, North Carolina, Mississippi, Kentucky, Alabama, and Kansas.
“The state of California stands strongly against any form of discrimination. (State law) AB 1887 authorizes my office to make that promise real,” California Attorney General Becerra said. “California will now bar state-funded or sponsored travel to South Carolina.”

As it would happen, Californians themselves have been pulling up stakes and moving their families to the very states that Attorney General Becerra has deemed so mean and offensive to California sensibilities that government workers and public university athletes cannot be allowed to travel to them.
Over the past five years, California has lost 2,641 people to South Carolina, who took more than $172 million in annual income with them to the Palmetto State. During that half decade, California experienced a net loss of more than 121,000 people to the ten states to which Becerra and company have banned travel. These ex-Californians brought more than $4 billion in annual income to those states included in the California travel ban.

Instead of spending time issuing more travel bans, a move that serves to both inconvenience student-athletes and heighten American political division, Attorney General Becerra and other California officials might want to reflect on the fact that they’re losing population to states they deem to be “backward” and why that might be happening.

California law is no longer open to letting state workers and public university athletes travel to ten states, including one that is the world’s 10th largest economy (Texas). Yet those ten states are welcoming tens of thousands of ex-Californians with open arms, lower tax rates, and public officials not focused on North Korea-style travel bans.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/patrickgleason/2019/04/16/no-californias-finances-are-not-back-in-black/#971bd9037b5e



Nice article Technoo...especially love the way it compares California to North Korea at the end. We are experiencing a tech boom that dwarfs the one in the 90's.....Thought I'd add a little positive spin to your draconian article....
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 13366
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Techno works hard to find a dystopian view.
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 7673
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
Techno works hard to find a dystopian view.

Too bad.. Its a low level rudimentary version of an article that I've read a million versions of. Telling me 2600 people moved to South Carolina from CA, does not move me.. Its expensive here, people get priced out, it happens..
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
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nw30



Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Posts: 6042
Location: The eye of the universe, Cen. Cal. coast

PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2019 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mat-ty wrote:
nw30 wrote:
boggsman1 wrote:
nw30 wrote:
It's tough to tell if she's from L.A. or the bay area, both places share the same fashion.


NW...I'd say Central Coast, maybe Pismo, or Cambria. I saw a few like her in Cambria, when I swung through last July....

BTW- Is Arroya Laguna the choice piece of sand you past a couple miles before the Elephant Seal lookout?
A bit late in seeing this (obviously), the answer is yep. A pic of me and my buddy Bruce about 6 weeks ago on a light day. And a pic of me, that I just saw on this site a few days ago, taken by Kevin Kan about a month ago. Funny thing though, I don't think I've ever met Kevin, and I don't think he's ever met me, but I could be wrong, I meet lots of other w'surfers & kiters there.


looks nice!!!! nothing better than an empty beach..
Starting in mid September, the crowd pretty much goes away, as well as the wild life, but in the spring it's a different story, we become outnumbered. Good sailing if you don't mind being part of the food chain.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3524

PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If this doesn't concern Californians, good for you. One day, the shit will hit the fan.

Quote:
California’s State and Local Liabilities Total $1.5 Trillion
By Marc Joffe and Edward Ring
January 3, 2019

We estimate that California’s total state and local government debt as of June 30, 2017 totaled just over $1.5 trillion. That total includes all outstanding bonds, loans, and other long-term liabilities, along with the officially reported unfunded liability for other post-employment benefits (primarily retiree healthcare), as well as unfunded pension liabilities.
This represents a rise of about $200 billion – or 15% – over our last debt analysis, in January 2017.

Our findings may appear to contradict reports that suggest a state budget surplus of about $9 billion. But the state’s spare cash and rainy day funds pale before the mountain of long-term liabilities that California governments at all levels have accumulated. Moreover, if the stock market drops, personal income tax and capital gains tax revenue will decline precipitously, wiping out these surpluses.

Our analysis differs from government reporting in a few ways, the most significant of which is governments’ use of a very generous expected rate of return on their pension fund investments. Using a more accurate rate, we calculate the total of unfunded pensions in California at $846 billion – $530 billion more than the official estimate of $316 billion. But even using only the officially reported estimates, California’s state and local governments are about $1.0 trillion in debt.


https://californiapolicycenter.org/californias-state-and-local-liabilities-total-1-5-trillion-2/
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boggsman1



Joined: 24 Jun 2002
Posts: 7673
Location: at a computer

PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Technoo.. California's GDP is $3.2T with a "T"
The US GDP is $20 TR, debt is $22Tr, so, CA has a pretty solid debt/gdp ratio, much better than the US, much better than many states, and something I would not worry about. We also have an extremely vibrant economy which supports the debt...
You can go back on Google(Big CA taxpayer) and search for another negative CA article now....
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coachg



Joined: 10 Sep 2000
Posts: 2801

PostPosted: Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ouch Techno,
Bitch slapped again. LOL
We appreciate your jealousy but you should be honest with yourself. The thing you hate most about CA is our diversity.

Coachg
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