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Immigration and children
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 6407

PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2019 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
mat-ty wrote:
mac wrote:
Here are the winners of the national spelling bee:

Quote:
They are: Rishik Gandhasri, 13, of California; Erin Howard, 14, of Alabama; Saketh Sundar, 13, of Maryland; Shruthika Padhy, 13, of New Jersey; Sohum Sukhatankar, 13, of Texas; Abhijay Kodali, 12, of Texas; Christopher Serrao, 13, of New Jersey and Raja, 13, of Texas.


No wonder Trump and the short attention span boys on this forum are so threatened by immigrants.



LEGAL!!!!! you ignorant fucking liberal retard.


Those seeking asylum are legal asshole. Trump and his fascist advisor Miller have targeted all immigrants. You keep cheering. It won't make up for not studying.


And 90% are gaming the system shithead , fact.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 12842
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2019 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fiction dumb shit. You haven't checked a fact in your life.
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 6407

PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2019 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
Fiction dumb shit. You haven't checked a fact in your life.



90% Mexicans...about 75% from the triangle....

Are you claiming the system is not being gamed??? are children being used as pawns???
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 12842
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2019 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mat-ty wrote:
mac wrote:
Fiction dumb shit. You haven't checked a fact in your life.



90% Mexicans...about 75% from the triangle....

Are you claiming the system is not being gamed??? are children being used as pawns???


A few facts, if you can read that far.

Quote:
Is seeking asylum legal?

Yes, seeking asylum is legal. Asylum seekers must be in the U.S. or at a port of entry (an airport or an official land crossing) to apply for, or request the opportunity to apply for, asylum. "There’s no way to ask for a visa or any type of authorization in advance for the purpose of seeking asylum,” says the International Rescue Committee’s director of immigration, Olga Byrne. “You just have to show up."

"While the administration is saying people should come here legally and follow a legal process, it's making it impossible to do so,” says Byrne. “So many individuals and families have been trying to follow a legal process, but instead they’ve been stranded in Tijuana or other northern Mexico towns because they have been denied access to any U.S. official.”

How do people seek asylum at the border?
Asylum seekers who arrive at the U.S. border are typically placed in either immigration court removal proceedings, where they will have a future opportunity to make their case for asylum before an administrative judge, or in expedited removal proceedings, which allow border agents to order an individual deported from the U.S. without a hearing before a judge.

However, under U.S. law, if a person in expedited removal states a fear of return to their home country or intention to apply for asylum, they will be referred for a credible fear interview conducted by a trained asylum officer within U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

A Central American girl holds a book as others traveling in a caravan climb the Mexico-U.S. border fence in an attempt to cross to San Diego County.
Every nation has the right to control its border. Both U.S. and international law also provide for the safe and legal movement of vulnerable people and the right to seek asylum.

The asylum seeker must prove to the officer that there is a “significant possibility” he or she is eligible for asylum, and must also be subject to a credibility assessment. If the officer makes a positive finding, the asylum seeker is referred to an immigration court where they will have the opportunity to apply for asylum before an immigration judge. If the individual does not meet the credible fear screening standard, he or she can be deported.

Some individuals who are already in the U.S., such as those who may have entered on a tourist visa or other temporary visa, may also apply for asylum. In those circumstances, the process for asylum varies.

How many people are granted asylum in the U.S.?
“Asylee” is the term used in the U.S. for people who have been granted asylum. Last year, 35,502 individuals were granted asylum. According to U.S. immigration law, a person granted asylum is legally allowed to remain in the U.S. without fear of deportation. They qualify to work, travel abroad, and apply for their spouse or children under the age of 21 to join them.

Having a legal representative significantly increases the likelihood of being granted asylum. One study found that asylum seekers who had submitted an asylum application before the immigration court were five times more likely to be granted asylum if they had a lawyer.

Where do asylum seekers in the U.S. come from?
At the start of 2019, Venezuelans and Central Americans were among the largest groups of people to apply for asylum in the U.S.

Three million Venezuelans have left the country since 2015 due to growing insecurity, instability and violence. People living in Central America’s Northern Triangle region—Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador—are enduring violence akin to a war zone. Many Central Americans fleeing to the U.S. border have traveled together in caravans for safety.

“The hardest part about living in El Salvador is the violence,” says 23-year-old Valentina, who fled to the U.S. after her family was threatened by gangs. “This is what makes life hard, because you leave your house and you don’t know if you’ll return. So yes, this is a war.”

On Feb. 15, the Trump administration declared a national emergency in order to build a physical barrier on the southern border. President Trump claimed that the number of people seeking asylum at the border amounts to a “national security crisis.” In fact, the number of irregular border crossings is at historic lows, according to the administration’s own Customs and Border Patrol figures. What has changed is that the number of people seeking protection has risen.

People fleeing their homes often seek safety elsewhere within their countries, moving multiple times to no avail. They embark on the journey to the U.S. because they are absolutely desperate and must escape, despite the dangers of the journey.

“Currently there is no place scarier than their homes,”

says Meghan Lopez, who leads the IRC’s work in El Salvador.


Like I said, you have never checked a fact in your life.
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 6407

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2019 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mac wrote:
mat-ty wrote:
mac wrote:
Fiction dumb shit. You haven't checked a fact in your life.



90% Mexicans...about 75% from the triangle....

Are you claiming the system is not being gamed??? are children being used as pawns???


A few facts, if you can read that far.

Quote:
Is seeking asylum legal?

Yes, seeking asylum is legal. Asylum seekers must be in the U.S. or at a port of entry (an airport or an official land crossing) to apply for, or request the opportunity to apply for, asylum. "There’s no way to ask for a visa or any type of authorization in advance for the purpose of seeking asylum,” says the International Rescue Committee’s director of immigration, Olga Byrne. “You just have to show up."

"While the administration is saying people should come here legally and follow a legal process, it's making it impossible to do so,” says Byrne. “So many individuals and families have been trying to follow a legal process, but instead they’ve been stranded in Tijuana or other northern Mexico towns because they have been denied access to any U.S. official.”

How do people seek asylum at the border?
Asylum seekers who arrive at the U.S. border are typically placed in either immigration court removal proceedings, where they will have a future opportunity to make their case for asylum before an administrative judge, or in expedited removal proceedings, which allow border agents to order an individual deported from the U.S. without a hearing before a judge.

However, under U.S. law, if a person in expedited removal states a fear of return to their home country or intention to apply for asylum, they will be referred for a credible fear interview conducted by a trained asylum officer within U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

A Central American girl holds a book as others traveling in a caravan climb the Mexico-U.S. border fence in an attempt to cross to San Diego County.
Every nation has the right to control its border. Both U.S. and international law also provide for the safe and legal movement of vulnerable people and the right to seek asylum.

The asylum seeker must prove to the officer that there is a “significant possibility” he or she is eligible for asylum, and must also be subject to a credibility assessment. If the officer makes a positive finding, the asylum seeker is referred to an immigration court where they will have the opportunity to apply for asylum before an immigration judge. If the individual does not meet the credible fear screening standard, he or she can be deported.

Some individuals who are already in the U.S., such as those who may have entered on a tourist visa or other temporary visa, may also apply for asylum. In those circumstances, the process for asylum varies.

How many people are granted asylum in the U.S.?
“Asylee” is the term used in the U.S. for people who have been granted asylum. Last year, 35,502 individuals were granted asylum. According to U.S. immigration law, a person granted asylum is legally allowed to remain in the U.S. without fear of deportation. They qualify to work, travel abroad, and apply for their spouse or children under the age of 21 to join them.

Having a legal representative significantly increases the likelihood of being granted asylum. One study found that asylum seekers who had submitted an asylum application before the immigration court were five times more likely to be granted asylum if they had a lawyer.

Where do asylum seekers in the U.S. come from?
At the start of 2019, Venezuelans and Central Americans were among the largest groups of people to apply for asylum in the U.S.

Three million Venezuelans have left the country since 2015 due to growing insecurity, instability and violence. People living in Central America’s Northern Triangle region—Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador—are enduring violence akin to a war zone. Many Central Americans fleeing to the U.S. border have traveled together in caravans for safety.

“The hardest part about living in El Salvador is the violence,” says 23-year-old Valentina, who fled to the U.S. after her family was threatened by gangs. “This is what makes life hard, because you leave your house and you don’t know if you’ll return. So yes, this is a war.”

On Feb. 15, the Trump administration declared a national emergency in order to build a physical barrier on the southern border. President Trump claimed that the number of people seeking asylum at the border amounts to a “national security crisis.” In fact, the number of irregular border crossings is at historic lows, according to the administration’s own Customs and Border Patrol figures. What has changed is that the number of people seeking protection has risen.

People fleeing their homes often seek safety elsewhere within their countries, moving multiple times to no avail. They embark on the journey to the U.S. because they are absolutely desperate and must escape, despite the dangers of the journey.

“Currently there is no place scarier than their homes,”

says Meghan Lopez, who leads the IRC’s work in El Salvador.


Like I said, you have never checked a fact in your life.



Facts?????????? more like spin and BS from like minded dipshits like you.

Answer my questions asshole....are people gaming our system? are they being taught how to game the system by left wing lawyers?? are children being used as pawns???
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J64TWB



Joined: 24 Dec 2013
Posts: 1263

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2019 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good morning Matty. Everything okay? You sound angry today.
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MalibuGuru



Joined: 11 Nov 1993
Posts: 8509

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bluefish1 wrote:
Good morning Matty. Everything okay? You sound angry today.


Mr. Roger's on valium today?
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 12842
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2019 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was too long for Matty to read. Trump’s lies are short and Matty’s all in.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 12842
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2019 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They’ve lost multiple lawsuits, but they are still separating children and putting them in inhumane conditions. Trump is trying to criminalize seeking asylum. And the right wing seems to love the cruelty.

https://www.newsweek.com/trump-family-separation-lawsuit-aclu-1445621
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mat-ty



Joined: 07 Jul 2007
Posts: 6407

PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2019 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Morons like you are the ones who are putting children in harms way. It's liberals who create the incentives to ILLEGALLY enter America, and encourage people to cross continents for their free ticket to America.....shameful, disgusting behavior.

Dems could gave a rats ass about the children. They have shut down funds for border improvements !7 times......liars , frauds , political DBs..
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