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how to measure current lines?

 
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qwertyjjj



Joined: 09 Jul 2015
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:18 am    Post subject: how to measure current lines? Reply with quote

Actually can;t remember the current length of my lines?
Do you just measure total length from the velcro strap to velcro strap or is it on the length of the rope?

I have the dakine adjustable lines but nowhere seems to say what they are adjustable between?

If I measure from boom to bottom, they are 13", so 26" if I double?
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manuel



Joined: 08 Oct 2007
Posts: 937

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depending on booms diameter, it seems that measuring from below the boom to end of lines x 2 = length of Dakine lines.
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qwertyjjj



Joined: 09 Jul 2015
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My lines are currently on max, is there a way to replace the existing line with a longer one? Probably just easier to buy a longer fixed line.
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westender



Joined: 02 Aug 2007
Posts: 1166
Location: Portland / Gorge

PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raise or lower the boom to suit the lines you have. Don't get caught in a numbers trap? Shocked
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GarryW



Joined: 11 Mar 2001
Posts: 152

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not to add to the confusion but a 26 inch harness line from Chinook isn't the same as a 26 inch harness line from Dakine. Chinook is a little bit longer.
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ss59



Joined: 10 Nov 2016
Posts: 69

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 4:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the Dakine Comp adjustable harness lines are stated as 24-32"

I think Dakine generally measure from the top of the webbing to the top of the webbing (not just the line) so your lines are probably 26" + around 4" for both the webbing attachments so 30" ish

So, in theory, if you bought a 32" fixed dakine line it will be a little longer (maybe)

also, the distance apart the velcro tabs are makes a small difference.

other brands just measure the line length and so a brand X 28" line may well be roughly the same as a Dakine 32" more or less

(without knowing much about your sailing, I wouldn't think you'd want to go longer than 32" (Dakine) unless you are float and ride wave sailing or have the tabs several feet apart


ps Don't move the boom to get the lines the right length!!
pps Just out of interest, why do you think you need longer lines?
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qwertyjjj



Joined: 09 Jul 2015
Posts: 98

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ss59 wrote:
the Dakine Comp adjustable harness lines are stated as 24-32"

I think Dakine generally measure from the top of the webbing to the top of the webbing (not just the line) so your lines are probably 26" + around 4" for both the webbing attachments so 30" ish

So, in theory, if you bought a 32" fixed dakine line it will be a little longer (maybe)

also, the distance apart the velcro tabs are makes a small difference.

other brands just measure the line length and so a brand X 28" line may well be roughly the same as a Dakine 32" more or less

(without knowing much about your sailing, I wouldn't think you'd want to go longer than 32" (Dakine) unless you are float and ride wave sailing or have the tabs several feet apart


ps Don't move the boom to get the lines the right length!!
pps Just out of interest, why do you think you need longer lines?


I've got a seat harness, and I'm just finding it very difficult to hook in. Like multiple tries to get hooked and can just about do it.
The only way I did on the last outing was to lower the boom but then I lost some power. The boom was at chest height rather than armpit/shoulder. I'm pretty sure these lines don't go to 32. If I measure with my elbow in the line and holding the boom then my wrist is actually a little bit above the boom, maybe 1-2"
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konajoe



Joined: 28 Feb 2010
Posts: 502

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How far apart are your lines? Should only be a few inches, not a few feet.
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techno900



Joined: 28 Mar 2001
Posts: 3452

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are so many variables, there is no right answer for line length. You just have to play/experiment with your gear and sailing conditions.

If you only sail in "good" wind conditions - good power and steady winds, lines can be shorter since you have to rake the sail back in the wind to hook in. On the other hand, where I sail it can be very gusty and I want to be hooked in while slogging, so my lines are longer (actually boom lower) so I can hook in by just getting up on my toes while barely moving. My shortest lines are 26" on my sails from 6.4 and smaller. Longer adjustable lines on my bigger sails.

However, I don't adjust my adjustable lines anymore - I did when I was racing Formula and had to shorten them on the upwind beats and lengthen on the down wind runs. Now, mostly reaching without much upwind or downwind when on my Formula board when I want to plane in lighter winds.
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ss59



Joined: 10 Nov 2016
Posts: 69

PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2018 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everyone is different, sails in different places, want to achieve different things and is at different levels, so this isn't a YOU MUST DO - just a 'this is what I do' - and how it all affects the length of lines I use- others will have very different ideas.

me - 6'1" 180lbs, I sail on the coast, I generally prefer to be on the smallest sail/board/fin possible for any given conditions. I have sailed quite a few Futura's over the years and own a 122 as my big board for winds 12-16kts, I have never used a seat harness.

The set up below I use was the same on a Futura 107 I recently sailed a fair bit, also have used on a Futura 117 and Isonic 107, 117 and a 110. On these boards, it will be flat(ish)water (not breaking waves), relatively constant coastal winds and not trying to win a race. Sails would be no cam 7.0-7.5 or, very occasionally, a similar sized 3 cam semi race sail.

On Starboards I generally start with the mast foot in the middle of the track.
From there, I have the boom set at a height where, when I lay the mast along the board it is roughly 3 finger widths past the tail (no idea where that would be relative to my chest height but if i were shorter I'd go less distance past the tail) - the boom height is my second most adjusted point while sailing and will vary between 1 fingers (lower for control) and a fist (higher for earlier planning)

My harness lines are from the tip of my elbow to the base of my fingers - in Dakines this is 32 (The North lines I used recently were labelled 30 for the same length-ish)
My harness line tabs are about 2-3 fingers apart - i set the velcro loose and adjust on the water rather than measuring. Sometimes have one set of lines fractionally further back than the other
My foot straps are full out and fullback for the back strap and outboard middle holes for the front foot.

I sail with the rig as upright as possible and never intentionally 'close the slot' or rack the rig back. Hooking in is easy and hooking out just requires a tiny pump of the sail.

It is my understanding that seat harnesses are harder to hook into, but maximise control vs effort - I also thought people using seat harnesses generally had shorter lines (elbow to the wrist or shorter) as the seat harness stance brings the rig more the windward - thereby reducing the distance between boom and hook. There may well be a specific technique to hook in with a seat harness!


another footnote - from another thread - are you absolutely sure you want an isonic / cammed sails???
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