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How to: Replace a Sail Panel
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 12 - Replacing a Sail Panel
Here’s where I put the insignia cloth for the flutter batten.

Next using pointy scissors cut “only the paper cover” of the seamstick tape about 2” from the batten pocket. The purpose for this will be explained later.



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Last edited by thombiz on Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 13 - Replacing a Sail Panel
INSTALLING THE NEW PANEL
Lay new monofilm or x-scrim over the panel to be replaced. Usually 7 mil monofilm will work for most replacement monofilm panels, however, for this sail I’m going to use x-scrim. Here, I’ve rolled out some Dimension Polyant T-858 5 mil. X-scrim where the new panel(s) will be.

I carefully align the strings in the x-scrim with existing strings in the OEM x-scrim. Next, I put two weights on the panel to hold it in place.

Although this example so far has been about replacing 1 panel, in the actual sail, I’m replacing the top 3 panels.

Next, once I’m sure the x-scrim is not going to move around, I use scissors to very carefully cut one vertical edge of the new panel precisely following the edge of the seam tape beneath the new x-scrim.

Next, I trim the other vertical edge, but this time I leave about ½” extra to allow for some correction when the panel gets stuck down.



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Last edited by thombiz on Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:35 pm; edited 3 times in total
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 14 - Replacing a Sail Panel
Next I guide the upper portion of the new x-scrim under the flutter batten rod and the batten pocket covers.

Next I smooth out the new x-scrim so that it lays nice and flat without humps and bumps. It is very important to have it lay very flat and tight to the original panel.



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Last edited by thombiz on Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:40 pm; edited 2 times in total
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 15 - Replacing a Sail Panel
Next is sticking the panel down. I always try to stick down the first edge which was trimmed, the edge which was cut very precisely to follow the edge of the seamstick tape below.

I start by gently lifting a corner of the x-scrim and peeling the paper off the seamstick at the flutter batten. I carefully lower the corner of the x-scrim, allowing the x-scrim to stick to the seamstick tape.

I pull the paper cover back about 3” and smooth out the x-scrim , then pull the paper back another 3” and smooth, repeating until the seam is adhered to the x-scrim. Doing it in 3” increments reduces the possibility of creating a pucker in the x-scrim. If you come up with a pucker, you need to do it over, even if it means taking up the seamstick tape and putting fresh tape down. Once convinced there are no puckers, press the seam together by firmly rubbing with your fingers.



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Last edited by thombiz on Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:52 pm; edited 4 times in total
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 16 - Replacing a Sail Panel
Next do the areas under the upper batten pocket cover.

Lift the lower batten cover and slide the x-scrim under it and stick it down.

When 3 sides of the perimeter of the panel are stuck down, the only remaining side to be stuck down will be the one that you left a little oversized. You can now take your scissors and trim it precisely to follow the edge of the seamstick tape.



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Last edited by thombiz on Mon Oct 08, 2018 1:54 pm; edited 3 times in total
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 17 - Replacing a Sail Panel
With that done, you can now use the scissors to trim the excess x-scrim which extends below the bottom batten pocket, and beyond the top batten pocket.

Your new panel should now be stuck down to the old panel on all edges of the perimeter.

Next, retrieve the insignia cloth seam cover tape you set aside earlier and put it back down where it came from. If the adhesive is in poor condition, ad a layer of seamstick to the insignia cloth tape to stick it down.

Only one more step and you’re ready to start sewing. The batten pocket covers need to be stuck down to the x-scrim. I usually use 1/4 inch Super-tack to do this, placing a strip along the bottom and top edges of the batten pocket you see thru the x-scrim.



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Last edited by thombiz on Mon Oct 08, 2018 2:06 pm; edited 4 times in total
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 18 - Replacing a Sail Panel
When you pull the paper covers off the seamstick tape, try to match the needle holes in the red pocket cover with the holes in the batten pocket you can see below as you stick the cover down. This will assure the cover is exactly where it was before the panel replacement. Once the covers are all stuck down, flip the sail over so the front side is up. It’s time to sew!

It doesn’t matter whether you do the batten pockets first then the side seams or the other way around. The key is to do good stitches. Use a piece from an old scrap sail to practice until you have your machine stitching well then proceed to sew in the new panel. Practice is the key, because the sewing machine feed dogs probably won’t be able to handle the sail weight and slickness so you are going to have to gently assist it to get it to feed smoothly. If your sewing machine only does a narrow zigzag, then instead of a wide 3 step zigzag, put 2 rows of the narrow zigzag. Practice, practice, practice……when you get it right....then do it!

The following materials were obtained from Dimension Polyant:
5 mil T-858 white string x-scrim

These materials were obtained from Challenge Sailcloth:
a. Super-Tack Seamstick by Venture tape 3/8" ASV3, 1/2" ASV4,
5/8" ASV5 rolls

b. Insignia Cloth/Polyester Draft Stripe ID3BKP Black 3" wide
Cut by me to desired width.
c. Heminway & Bartlett V69 UV resistant thread 1oz Spools
VU69BK in black and VU69W in White These are small spools
so you may need to get 2 or 3 so you don't run out.
d. Package of 10 TSEA1 Deluxe Seam Rippers

Curved forceps can be found on Ebay.

Sewing Machines: The most often used machines are the Bernina 217n. These are often rebadged as Adler 1217 and the Chandler 217. These machines make difficult work easy. Out of the box they can do good zigzag work and good straight line work. Some have cam readers and cams which allow them to do 3-step zigzags, standard zigzags, straight work, and decorative work all with the same machine. Some machines like the Consew 146, are ok in a pinch, but they make easy work difficult. Most Pfaff's ending in 8 (like Pfaff 118, 138, 218,238, 418, 438, 918, 938) should be up to the task. Pfaff parts are extremely over priced. One replacement foot cost me $230. Some Singer 20U's are capable of doing this kind of work. There are many knockoffs of the 20U, just do a google of the word 20U43. The key is to get whichever machine you choose slowed down with a servo motor to drive the sewing head. Most industrial machines are set up to sew at full speed or roughly 1800 stitches per minute or 30 stitches per second. You need one that sews at 3 to 8 stitches per second. Hardly any home zigzag machines can sew the size 69 thread and use size 21 or 22 needles and be able to keep the stitches tight and strong enough for the loads encountered.

I adjust the height of the sewing machine table top to match the height of the banquet tables I use as a worksurface.
I hope this helps.
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thombiz



Joined: 25 Jun 2007
Posts: 742
Location: Corpus Christi

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Page 19 - Replacing a Sail Panel
Once the sewing is done, the last thing to do is to remove the old damaged panel. Position the sail so that the old panel is up when laying on the work tables. The old panel can be removed in two ways. If you have good, sharp, pointy scissors you can use them carefully to remove the old panel by cutting along the perimeter edge of the clear portion of the old damaged panel. Second way is to use your seam ripper to cut away the old damaged panel. To use your seam ripper, go to one of the tears in the old panel. Place the ball of the seam ripper between the old panel and the new panel and slide the seam ripper along, cutting the old panel, moving the ripper very close to the perimeter edge of the clear portion of the old panel. The ball helps to lift and separate the old panel from the new panel so there is very little possibility of mistakenly damaging the new panel. Be slow and carefull not to cut into perimeter seams, or the batten pockets.

Replace the battens, tension them, and the sail is ready to use.
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windydoug



Joined: 22 Jun 2005
Posts: 67
Location: Western NY

PostPosted: Tue Oct 09, 2018 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know that I will ever have the need to do this Thom, but thanks for taking the time to get this great tutorial archived on the forum for all of us. Thorough and easily understood.
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boardsurfr



Joined: 23 Aug 2001
Posts: 1205

PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great tutorial, Bob. If Nina won't fix my sails, I can now threaten to use your instructions to do it myself. The thought of me working on her sewing machine should be enough to get her started Wink
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