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Eagles and DDT
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16260
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2021 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's always kind of funny to be scolded by a man who uses Steven Milloy talking points to attack environmentalists as "latte sipping liberals" who don't care about the health of children in poor countries. Mrgybe gets particularly excited when he can care about the use of dangerous chemicals to protect children from malaria--issues like eradication of polio, starvation, climate change and the like escape his attention.

I freely admit that I knew nothing at all about the use of indoor residual spraying when gybe first attacked me, and EPA. The resurgence of using DDT to attack the libs was part of a right wing media blitz. Mrgybe's role in this was to deny the adverse effects of DDT and describe William Ruckleshaus as a "stooge." The current thread, of course, demonstrates that gybe was dead wrong about the impacts of DDT that led to its banning. So rather than his right wing sources, here is the current web page at EPA:

Quote:
DDT - A Brief History and Status
Development of DDT
DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) was developed as the first of the modern synthetic insecticides in the 1940s. It was initially used with great effect to combat malaria, typhus, and the other insect-borne human diseases among both military and civilian populations. It also was effective for insect control in crop and livestock production, institutions, homes, and gardens. DDT's quick success as a pesticide and broad use in the United States and other countries led to the development of resistance by many insect pest species.

Regulation Due to Health and Environmental Effects
The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the federal agency with responsibility for regulating pesticides before the formation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, began regulatory actions in the late 1950s and 1960s to prohibit many of DDT's uses because of mounting evidence of the pesticide's declining benefits and environmental and toxicological effects. The publication in 1962 of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring stimulated widespread public concern over the dangers of improper pesticide use and the need for better pesticide controls.

In 1972, EPA issued a cancellation order for DDT based on its adverse environmental effects, such as those to wildlife, as well as its potential human health risks. Since then, studies have continued, and a relationship between DDT exposure and reproductive effects in humans is suspected, based on studies in animals. In addition, some animals exposed to DDT in studies developed liver tumors. As a result, today, DDT is classified as a probable human carcinogen by U.S. and international authorities.

DDT is:

known to be very persistent in the environment,
will accumulate in fatty tissues, and
can travel long distances in the upper atmosphere.

After the use of DDT was discontinued in the United States, its concentration in the environment and animals has decreased, but because of its persistence, residues of concern from historical use still remain.

Current Status
Since 1996, EPA has been participating in international negotiations to control the use of DDT and other persistent organic pollutants used around the world. Under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme, countries joined together and negotiated a treaty to enact global bans or restrictions on persistent organic pollutants (POPs), a group that includes DDT. This treaty is known as the Stockholm Convention on POPs. The Convention includes a limited exemption for the use of DDT to control mosquitoes that transmit the microbe that causes malaria - a disease that still kills millions of people worldwide.

In September 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared its support for the indoor use of DDT in African countries where malaria remains a major health problem, citing that benefits of the pesticide outweigh the health and environmental risks. The WHO position is consistent with the Stockholm Convention on POPs, which bans DDT for all uses except for malaria control.

DDT is one of 12 pesticides recommended by the WHO for indoor residual spray programs. It is up to individual countries to decide whether or not to use DDT. EPA works with other agencies and countries to advise them on how DDT programs are developed and monitored, with the goal that DDT be used only within the context of programs referred to as Integrated Vector Management. EXIT IVM is a decision-making process for use of resources to yield the best possible results in vector control, and that it be kept out of agricultural sectors.


One of the other canards that gybe has spread is that the banning of DDT in the US led to its banning everywhere--and the death of children from malaria. In fact, there was a long and agonized debate over the use of DDT, which culminated in the Stockholm Convention banning DDT, adopted in 2001. Subsequent efforts, supported by many environmental groups, supported the use of DDT as one of twelve chemicals for ISR.

Perhaps the alarm on behalf of mrgybe and the chemical industry is the continuing debate over phasing this use out.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16260
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

J64TWB wrote:
1/2 million barrels.

https://www.latimes.com/projects/la-coast-ddt-dumping-ground/


Thanks for the link, I had not seen this story. I know both Mark Gold and Bob Riseborough quite well, both good guys. One of the complications of trying to clean up the DDT off the Palos Verdes shelf is that if you cover it, you increase the load on top—and that can cause subsurface landslides and mass wasting, spreading the material more. No wonder gybe wanted to quickly post a diversion. After all, he and his buddies have always characterized the impacts as speculative “possible negative effects”, and those who are concerned as panicky latte sipping liberals who don’t care about malaria. When you get organized nonsense like that, somebody is making money.
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mac



Joined: 07 Mar 1999
Posts: 16260
Location: Berkeley, California

PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2021 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Behind policy changes like banning DDT for general use, there is science--not Montrose talking points. From this month's Smithsonian:

Quote:
Over the decades, Hawk Mountain and its raptor-migration data would assume a growing—if mostly unheralded—role in the conservation movement. Rachel Carson first visited Hawk Mountain in the fall of 1945. The raptors, she noted with delight, “came by like brown leaves drifting on the wind.” She was then 38 and serving as a writer and editor for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “Sometimes a lone bird rode the air currents,” she wrote, “sometimes several at a time, sweeping upward until they were only specks against the clouds or dropping down again toward the valley floor below us; sometimes a great burst of them milling and tossing, like the flurry of leaves when a sudden gust of wind shakes loose a new batch from the forest trees.”

Fifteen years later, when Carson was studying the effects of widespread pesticide usage, she sent a letter to the sanctuary caretaker: “I have seen you quoted at various times to the effect that you now see very few immature eagles in fall migration over Hawk Mountain. Would you be good enough to write me your comments on this, with any details and figures you think significant?”

Broun responded that between 1935 and 1939, the first four years of the daily bird counts at Hawk Mountain, some 40 percent of the bald eagles he observed were young birds. Two decades later, however, young birds made up just 20 percent of the total number of bald eagles recorded, and in 1957, he had counted only one young eagle for every 32 adults. Broun’s report would become a key piece of evidence in Carson’s legendary 1962 book Silent Spring, which exposed the environmental damage done by widespread use of the pesticide DDT.
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